Don’t be “Clever”: The Double Curly Braces Anti Pattern

From time to time, I find someone using the double curly braces anti pattern (also called double brace initialisation) in the wild. This time on Stack Overflow:

Map source = new HashMap(){{
    put("firstName", "John");
    put("lastName", "Smith");
    put("organizations", new HashMap(){{
        put("0", new HashMap(){{
            put("id", "1234");
        }});
        put("abc", new HashMap(){{
            put("id", "5678");
        }});
    }});
}};

In case you do not understand the syntax, it’s actually easy. There are two elements:

  1. We’re creating anonymous classes that extend HashMap by writing
    new HashMap() {
    }
    
  2. In that anonymous class, we’re using an instance initialiser to initialise the new anonymous HashMap subtype instance by writing things like:

    {
        put("id", "1234");
    }
    

    Essentially, these initialisers are just constructor code.

So, why is this called the Double Curly Braces Anti Pattern

58731480

There are really three reasons for this to be an anti pattern:

1. Readability

This is the least important reason, it’s readability. While it may be a bit easier to write, and feel a bit more like the equivalent data structure initialisation in JSON:

{
  "firstName"     : "John"
, "lastName"      : "Smith"
, "organizations" : 
  {
    "0"   : { "id", "1234" }
  , "abc" : { "id", "5678" }
  }
}

And yes. It would be really awesome if Java had collection literals for List and Map types. Using double curly braces to emulate that is quirky and doesn’t feel quite right, syntactically.

But let’s leave the area where we discuss taste and curly braces (we’ve done that before), because:

2. One type per instance

We’re really creating one type per double brace initialisation! Every time we create a new map this way, we’re also implicitly creating a new non-reusable class just for that one simple instance of a HashMap. If you’re doing this once, that might be fine. If you put this sort of code all over a huge application, you will put some unnecessary burden on your ClassLoader, which keeps references to all these class objects on your heap. Don’t believe it? Compile the above code and check out the compiler output. It will look like this:

Test$1$1$1.class
Test$1$1$2.class
Test$1$1.class
Test$1.class
Test.class

Where the Test.class is the only reasonable class here, the enclosing class.

But that’s still not the most important issue.

3. Memory leak!

The really most important issue is the problem that all anonymous classes have. They contain a reference to their enclosing instance, and that is really a killer. Let’s imagine, you put your clever HashMap initialisation into an EJB or whatever really heavy object with a well-managed lifecycle like this:

public class ReallyHeavyObject {

    // Just to illustrate...
    private int[] tonsOfValues;
    private Resource[] tonsOfResources;

    // This method almost does nothing
    public void quickHarmlessMethod() {
        Map source = new HashMap(){{
            put("firstName", "John");
            put("lastName", "Smith");
            put("organizations", new HashMap(){{
                put("0", new HashMap(){{
                    put("id", "1234");
                }});
                put("abc", new HashMap(){{
                    put("id", "5678");
                }});
            }});
        }};
        
        // Some more code here
    }
}

So this ReallyHeavyObject has tons of resources that need to be cleaned up correctly as soon as they’re garbage collected, or whatever. But that doesn’t matter for you when you’re calling the quickHarmlessMethod(), which executes in no time.

Fine.

Let’s imagine some other developer, who refactors that method to return your map, or even parts of your map:

    public Map quickHarmlessMethod() {
        Map source = new HashMap(){{
            put("firstName", "John");
            put("lastName", "Smith");
            put("organizations", new HashMap(){{
                put("0", new HashMap(){{
                    put("id", "1234");
                }});
                put("abc", new HashMap(){{
                    put("id", "5678");
                }});
            }});
        }};
        
        return source;
    }

Now you’re in big big trouble! You have now inadvertently exposed all the state from ReallyHeavyObject to the outside, because each of those inner classes holds a reference to the enclosing instance, which is the ReallyHeavyObject instance. Don’t believe it? Let’s run this program:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    Map map = new ReallyHeavyObject().quickHarmlessMethod();
    Field field = map.getClass().getDeclaredField("this$0");
    field.setAccessible(true);
    System.out.println(field.get(map).getClass());
}

This program returns

class ReallyHeavyObject

Yes, indeed! If you still don’t believe it, you can use a debugger to introspect the returned map:

debug-output

You will see the enclosing instance reference right there in your anonymous HashMap subtype. And all the nested anonymous HashMap subtypes also hold such a reference.

So, please, never use this anti pattern

You might say that one way to circumvent all that hassle from issue 3 is to make the quickHarmlessMethod() a static method to prevent that enclosing instance, and you’re right about that.

But the worst thing that we’ve seen in the above code is the fact that even if you know what you are doing with your map that you might be creating in a static context, the next developer might not notice that and refactor / remove static again. They might store the Map in some other singleton instance and there is literally no way to tell from the code itself that there might just be a dangling, useless reference to ReallyHeavyObject.

Inner classes are a beast. They have caused a lot of trouble and cognitive dissonance in the past. Anonymous inner classes can be even worse, because readers of such code might really be completely oblivious of the fact that they’re enclosing an outer instance and that they’re passing around this enclosed outer instance.

The conclusion is:

Don’t be clever, don’t ever use double brace initialisation

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Do You Really Understand SQL’s GROUP BY and HAVING clauses?

There are some things in SQL that we simply take for granted without thinking about them properly.

One of these things are the GROUP BY and the less popular HAVING clauses. Let’s look at a simple example. For this example, we’ll reiterate the example database we’ve seen in this previous article about the awesome LEAD(), LAG(), FIRST_VALUE(), LAST_VALUE() functions:

CREATE TABLE countries (
  code CHAR(2) NOT NULL,
  year INT NOT NULL,
  gdp_per_capita DECIMAL(10, 2) NOT NULL,
  govt_debt DECIMAL(10, 2) NOT NULL
);

Before there were window functions, aggregations were made only with GROUP BY. A typical question that we could ask our database using SQL is:

What are the top 3 average government debts in percent of the GDP for those countries whose GDP per capita was over 40’000 dollars in every year in the last four years

Whew. Some (academic) business requirements.

In SQL (PostgreSQL dialect), we would write:

select code, avg(govt_debt)
from countries
where year > 2010
group by code
having min(gdp_per_capita) >= 40000
order by 2 desc
limit 3

Or, with inline comments

-- The average government debt
select code, avg(govt_debt)

-- for those countries
from countries

-- in the last four years
where year > 2010

-- yepp, for the countries
group by code

-- whose GDP p.c. was over 40'000 in every year
having min(gdp_per_capita) >= 40000

-- The top 3
order by 2 desc
limit 3

The result being:

code     avg
------------
JP    193.00
US     91.95
DE     56.00

Remember the 10 easy steps to a complete understanding of SQL:

  1. FROM generates the data set
  2. WHERE filters the generated data set
  3. GROUP BY aggregates the filtered data set
  4. HAVING filters the aggregated data set
  5. SELECT transforms the filters aggregated data set
  6. ORDER BY sorts the transformed data set
  7. LIMIT .. OFFSET frames the sorted data set

… where LIMIT .. OFFSET may come in very different flavours.

The empty GROUP BY clause

A very special case of GROUP BY is the explicit or implicit empty GROUP BY clause. Here’s a question that we could ask our database:

Are there any countries at all with a GDP per capita of more than 50’000 dollars?

And in SQL, we’d write:

select true answer
from countries
having max(gdp_per_capita) >= 50000

The result being

answer
------
t

You could of course have used the EXISTS clause instead (please don’t use COUNT(*) in these cases):

select exists(
  select 1 
  from countries 
  where gdp_per_capita >= 50000
);

And we would get, again:

answer
------
t

… but let’s focus on the plain HAVING clause.

Not everyone knows that HAVING can be used all by itself, or what it even means to have HAVING all by itself. Already the SQL 1992 standard allowed for the use of HAVING without GROUP BY, but it wasn’t until the introduction of GROUPING SETS in SQL:1999, when the semantics of this syntax was retroactively unambiguously defined:

7.10 <having clause>

<having clause> ::= HAVING <search condition>

Syntax Rules

1) Let HC be the <having clause>. Let TE be the <table expression> that immediately contains
HC. If TE does not immediately contain a <group by clause>, then GROUP BY ( ) is implicit.

That’s interesting. There is an implicit GROUP BY ( ), if we leave out the explicit GROUP BY clause. If you’re willing to delve into the SQL standard a bit more, you’ll find:

<group by clause> ::=
    GROUP BY <grouping specification>

<grouping specification> ::=
    <grouping column reference>
  | <rollup list>
  | <cube list>
  | <grouping sets list>
  | <grand total>
  | <concatenated grouping>

<grouping set> ::=
    <ordinary grouping set>
  | <rollup list>
  | <cube list>
  | <grand total>

<grand total> ::= <left paren> <right paren>

So, GROUP BY ( ) is essentially grouping by a “grand total”, which is what’s intuitively happening, if we just look for the highest ever GDP per capita:

select max(gdp_per_capita)
from countries;

Which yields:

     max
--------
52409.00

The above query is also implicitly the same as this one (which isn’t supported by PostgreSQL):

select max(gdp_per_capita)
from countries
group by ();

(but beware, this isn’t always the case – read this interesting article by Glenn Paulley for details)

The awesome GROUPING SETs

In this section of the article, we’ll be leaving PostgreSQL land, entering SQL Server land, as PostgreSQL shamefully doesn’t implement any of the following (yet).

Now, we cannot understand the grand total (empty GROUP BY ( ) clause), without having a short look at the SQL:1999 standard GROUPING SETS. Some of you may have heard of CUBE() or ROLLUP() grouping functions, which are just syntactic sugar for commonly used GROUPING SETS. Let’s try to answer this question in a single query:

What are the highest GDP per capita values per year OR per country

In SQL, we’ll write:

select code, year, max(gdp_per_capita)
from countries
group by grouping sets ((code), (year))

Which yields two concatenated sets of records:

code    year    max
------------------------
NULL    2009    46999.00 <- grouped by year
NULL    2010    48358.00
NULL    2011    51791.00
NULL    2012    52409.00

CA      NULL    52409.00 <- grouped by code
DE      NULL    44355.00
FR      NULL    42578.00
GB      NULL    38927.00
IT      NULL    36988.00
JP      NULL    46548.00
RU      NULL    14091.00
US      NULL    51755.00

That’s kind of nice, isn’t it? It’s essentially just the same thing as this query with UNION ALL

select code, null, max(gdp_per_capita)
from countries
group by code
union all
select null, year, max(gdp_per_capita)
from countries
group by year;

In fact, it’s exactly the same thing, as the latter explicitly concatenates two sets of grouped records… i.e. two GROUPING SETS. This SQL Server documentation page also explains it very nicely.

And the most powerful of them all: CUBE()

Now, imagine, you’d like to add the “grand total”, and also the highest value per country AND year, producing four different concatenated sets. To limit the results, we’ll also filter out GDPs of less than 48000 for this example:

select 
  code, year, max(gdp_per_capita), 
  grouping_id(code, year) grp
from countries
where gdp_per_capita >= 48000
group by grouping sets (
  (), 
  (code), 
  (year), 
  (code, year)
)
order by grp desc;

This nice-looking query will now produce all the possible grouping combinations that we can imagine, including the grand total, in order to produce:

code    year    max         grp
---------------------------------
NULL    NULL    52409.00    3 <- grand total

NULL    2012    52409.00    2 <- group by year
NULL    2010    48358.00    2
NULL    2011    51791.00    2

CA      NULL    52409.00    1 <- group by code
US      NULL    51755.00    1

US      2010    48358.00    0 <- group by code and year
CA      2012    52409.00    0
US      2012    51755.00    0
CA      2011    51791.00    0
US      2011    49855.00    0

And because this is quite a common operation in reporting and in OLAP, we can simply write the same by using the CUBE() function:

select 
  code, year, max(gdp_per_capita), 
  grouping_id(code, year) grp
from countries
where gdp_per_capita >= 48000
group by cube(code, year)
order by grp desc;

Compatibility

While the first couple of queries also worked on PostgreSQL, the ones that are using GROUPING SETS will work only on 4 out of 17 RDBMS currently supported by jOOQ. These are:

  • DB2
  • Oracle
  • SQL Server
  • Sybase SQL Anywhere

jOOQ also fully supports the previously mentioned syntaxes. The GROUPING SETS variant can be written as such:

// Countries is an object generated by the jOOQ
// code generator for the COUNTRIES table.
Countries c = COUNTRIES;

ctx.select(
       c.CODE,
       c.YEAR,
       max(c.GDP_PER_CAPITA),
       groupingId(c.CODE, c.YEAR).as("grp"))
   .from(c)
   .where(c.GDP_PER_CAPITA.ge(new BigDecimal("48000")))
   .groupBy(groupingSets(new Field[][] {
       {},
       { c.CODE },
       { c.YEAR },
       { c.CODE, c.YEAR }
   }))
   .orderBy(fieldByName("grp").desc())
   .fetch();

… or the CUBE() version:

ctx.select(
       c.CODE,
       c.YEAR,
       max(c.GDP_PER_CAPITA),
       groupingId(c.CODE, c.YEAR).as("grp"))
   .from(c)
   .where(c.GDP_PER_CAPITA.ge(new BigDecimal("48000")))
   .groupBy(cube(c.CODE, c.YEAR))
   .orderBy(fieldByName("grp").desc())
   .fetch();

jOOQ is the best way to write SQL in Java

… and in the future, we’ll emulate GROUPING SETS by their equivalent UNION ALL queries in those databases that do not natively support GROUPING SETS.

Try it out for yourself and download your free jOOQ trial now!

How to Integrate Commercial Third-Party Artefacts into Your Maven Build

According to a recent survey by ZeroTurnaround’s RebelLabs, Maven is still the leading Java build platform. The current market share distribution, according to RebelLabs is:

  • Maven with 64%
  • Ant + Ivy with 16.5%
  • Gradle with 11%

Yet, at the same time, Maven is often criticised for being a bit obscure and intrusive. Compared to runner-ups Ant and Gradle, Maven allows for only little flexibility with respect to interpretation and thus custom adaptation of the build model. Or as Tim Berglund from Data Stax would put it:

But let’s cut the jokes and have a look at a real-world issue:

Integrating Third-Party Commercial Artefacts

Not all third party artefacts that you would like to depend upon are available for free from Maven Central. Examples for this are commercial JDBC drivers, or the commercial jOOQ editions. There are essentially three ways to integrate such artefacts into your build:

Quick-and-dirty

Often, you only need the commercial dependency for a small test project or demo. You want to be sure that it works when you run it without depending on your local repository setup, or on network connectivity. This is a good use-case for <scope>system</scope>:

For instance: jOOQ

<dependency>
  <groupId>org.jooq</groupId>
  <artifactId>jooq</artifactId>
  <version>${jooq.version}</version>
  <scope>system</scope>
  <systemPath>${basedir}/lib/jooq-${jooq.version}.jar</systemPath>
</dependency>

For instance: Microsoft SQL JDBC

<dependency>
  <groupId>com.microsoft.sqlserver</groupId>
  <artifactId>sqljdbc4</artifactId>
  <version>3.0</version>
  <scope>system</scope>
  <systemPath>${basedir}/lib/sqljdbc4.jar</systemPath>

  <!-- Notice that we can still put "optional"
       on commercial JDBC driver dependencies -->
  <optional>true</optional>
</dependency>

Advantages of this approach

This is really a very easy solution when you want to have a local, self-contained module that is guaranteed to run immediately after checkout from source control, without additional configuration and setup. Don’t forget to check in the libraries into source control first, of course.

Disadvantages of this appraoch

The system dependencies are never transitively inherited. If your module depends on jOOQ this way, your module’s dependencies won’t see the jOOQ API.

Details about system dependencies can be seen in the Maven documentation. Citing from the documentation:

Dependencies with the scope system are always available and are not looked up in repository. They are usually used to tell Maven about dependencies which are provided by the JDK or the VM. Thus, system dependencies are especially useful for resolving dependencies on artifacts which are now provided by the JDK, but where available as separate downloads earlier. Typical example are the JDBC standard extensions or the Java Authentication and Authorization Service (JAAS).

A bit more robust

An approach that might appear to be a bit more robust is to check out the dependencies from your version control system and then “manually” import them to your local repository. This will make them available to your own local build. The following shell scripts show how you can import, for instance, the jOOQ artefacts into your local repository

Windows Batch

@echo off
set VERSION=3.4.4

if exist jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar (
  set JAVADOC_JOOQ=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar
  set JAVADOC_JOOQ_META=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-meta-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar
  set JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-codegen-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar
  set JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-codegen-maven-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar
  set JAVADOC_JOOQ_SCALA=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-scala-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar
)

if exist jOOQ-src\jooq-%VERSION%-sources.jar (
  set SOURCES_JOOQ=-Dsources=jOOQ-src\jooq-%VERSION%-sources.jar
  set SOURCES_JOOQ_META=-Dsources=jOOQ-src\jooq-meta-%VERSION%-sources.jar
  set SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN=-Dsources=jOOQ-src\jooq-codegen-%VERSION%-sources.jar
  set SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN=-Dsources=jOOQ-src\jooq-codegen-maven-%VERSION%-sources.jar
  set SOURCES_JOOQ_SCALA=-Dsources=jOOQ-src\jooq-scala-%VERSION%-sources.jar
)

call mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-pom\pom.xml                          -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-parent        -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=pom
call mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib\jooq-%VERSION%.jar               -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq               -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=jar %JAVADOC_JOOQ%               %SOURCES_JOOQ%              -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom\jooq\pom.xml
call mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib\jooq-meta-%VERSION%.jar          -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-meta          -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=jar %JAVADOC_JOOQ_META%          %SOURCES_JOOQ_META%         -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom\jooq-meta\pom.xml
call mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib\jooq-codegen-%VERSION%.jar       -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-codegen       -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=jar %JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN%       %SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN%      -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom\jooq-codegen\pom.xml
call mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib\jooq-codegen-maven-%VERSION%.jar -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-codegen-maven -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=jar %JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN% %SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN_META% -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom\jooq-codegen-maven\pom.xml
call mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib\jooq-scala-%VERSION%.jar         -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-scala         -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=jar %JAVADOC_JOOQ_SCALA%         %SOURCES_JOOQ_SCALA%        -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom\jooq-scala\pom.xml

Linux Shell

#!/bin/sh
VERSION=3.4.4

if [ -f jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-$VERSION-javadoc.jar ]; then
  JAVADOC_JOOQ=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-$VERSION-javadoc.jar
  JAVADOC_JOOQ_META=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-meta-$VERSION-javadoc.jar
  JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-codegen-$VERSION-javadoc.jar
  JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-codegen-maven-$VERSION-javadoc.jar
  JAVADOC_JOOQ_SCALA=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-scala-$VERSION-javadoc.jar
fi

if [ -f jOOQ-src/jooq-$VERSION-sources.jar ]; then
  SOURCES_JOOQ=-Dsources=jOOQ-src/jooq-$VERSION-sources.jar
  SOURCES_JOOQ_META=-Dsources=jOOQ-src/jooq-meta-$VERSION-sources.jar
  SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN=-Dsources=jOOQ-src/jooq-codegen-$VERSION-sources.jar
  SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN=-Dsources=jOOQ-src/jooq-codegen-maven-$VERSION-sources.jar
  SOURCES_JOOQ_SCALA=-Dsources=jOOQ-src/jooq-scala-$VERSION-sources.jar
fi

mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-pom/pom.xml                         -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-parent        -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=pom
mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib/jooq-$VERSION.jar               -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq               -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=jar $JAVADOC_JOOQ               $SOURCES_JOOQ              -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom/jooq/pom.xml
mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib/jooq-meta-$VERSION.jar          -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-meta          -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=jar $JAVADOC_JOOQ_META          $SOURCES_JOOQ_META         -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom/jooq-meta/pom.xml
mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib/jooq-codegen-$VERSION.jar       -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-codegen       -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=jar $JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN       $SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN      -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom/jooq-codegen/pom.xml
mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib/jooq-codegen-maven-$VERSION.jar -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-codegen-maven -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=jar $JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN $SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN_META -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom/jooq-codegen-maven/pom.xml
mvn install:install-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib/jooq-scala-$VERSION.jar         -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-scala         -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=jar $JAVADOC_JOOQ_SCALA         $SOURCES_JOOQ_SCALA        -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom/jooq-scala/pom.xml

More up to date versions of these scripts can be found here:
https://github.com/jOOQ/jOOQ/tree/master/jOOQ-release/release/template

The above scripts essentially check if any of Javadoc, Sources, and/or binaries are available in the distribution, and then install:

  • The parent pom.xml
  • The various artefact binaries, sources, javadocs, and pom.xml files

Advantages of this approach

Dependencies can now be referenced like any other type of dependency, as the artefacts are registered in your local repository. Moreover, they’re also available to your module’s own dependencies, transitively – which is probably what you want when you’re using jOOQ. Here’s how you’d then specify the dependencies:

<dependency>
  <groupId>org.jooq</groupId>
  <artifactId>jooq</artifactId>
  <version>${jooq.version}</version>
</dependency>

<dependency>
  <groupId>com.microsoft.sqlserver</groupId>
  <artifactId>sqljdbc4</artifactId>
  <version>3.0</version>
  <scope>provided</scope>
</dependency>

Disadvantages of this approach

There is a manual step involved in the installation of the dependencies. If you don’t have the above scripts readily available, it can be quite tedious to figure out exactly how to import all those dependencies step by step into your repository. Specifically if you’re running a demo or prototype, this may lead to unexpected compilation failure in the worst moments.

Deploying

If, instead of installing, you’d like to deploy the artifacts to some remote repository, use these adapted scripts instead:

Windows Batch

@echo off
set VERSION=3.4.4
set REPOSITORY=[set your repository name here, as in settings.xml]
set URL=[set your server URL here]

if exist jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar (
  set JAVADOC_JOOQ=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar
  set JAVADOC_JOOQ_META=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-meta-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar
  set JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-codegen-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar
  set JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-codegen-maven-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar
  set JAVADOC_JOOQ_SCALA=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc\jooq-scala-%VERSION%-javadoc.jar
)

if exist jOOQ-src\jooq-%VERSION%-sources.jar (
  set SOURCES_JOOQ=-Dsources=jOOQ-src\jooq-%VERSION%-sources.jar
  set SOURCES_JOOQ_META=-Dsources=jOOQ-src\jooq-meta-%VERSION%-sources.jar
  set SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN=-Dsources=jOOQ-src\jooq-codegen-%VERSION%-sources.jar
  set SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN=-Dsources=jOOQ-src\jooq-codegen-maven-%VERSION%-sources.jar
  set SOURCES_JOOQ_SCALA=-Dsources=jOOQ-src\jooq-scala-%VERSION%-sources.jar
)

call mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-pom\pom.xml                          -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-parent        -DrepositoryId=%REPOSITORY% -Durl=%URL% -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=pom
call mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib\jooq-%VERSION%.jar               -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq               -DrepositoryId=%REPOSITORY% -Durl=%URL% -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=jar %JAVADOC_JOOQ%               %SOURCES_JOOQ%              -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom\jooq\pom.xml
call mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib\jooq-meta-%VERSION%.jar          -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-meta          -DrepositoryId=%REPOSITORY% -Durl=%URL% -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=jar %JAVADOC_JOOQ_META%          %SOURCES_JOOQ_META%         -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom\jooq-meta\pom.xml
call mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib\jooq-codegen-%VERSION%.jar       -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-codegen       -DrepositoryId=%REPOSITORY% -Durl=%URL% -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=jar %JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN%       %SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN%      -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom\jooq-codegen\pom.xml
call mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib\jooq-codegen-maven-%VERSION%.jar -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-codegen-maven -DrepositoryId=%REPOSITORY% -Durl=%URL% -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=jar %JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN% %SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN_META% -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom\jooq-codegen-maven\pom.xml
call mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib\jooq-scala-%VERSION%.jar         -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-scala         -DrepositoryId=%REPOSITORY% -Durl=%URL% -Dversion=%VERSION% -Dpackaging=jar %JAVADOC_JOOQ_SCALA%         %SOURCES_JOOQ_SCALA%        -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom\jooq-scala\pom.xml

Linux Shell

#!/bin/sh
VERSION=3.4.4
REPOSITORY=[set your repository name here, as in settings.xml]
URL=[set your server URL here]

if [ -f jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-$VERSION-javadoc.jar ]; then
  JAVADOC_JOOQ=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-$VERSION-javadoc.jar
  JAVADOC_JOOQ_META=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-meta-$VERSION-javadoc.jar
  JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-codegen-$VERSION-javadoc.jar
  JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-codegen-maven-$VERSION-javadoc.jar
  JAVADOC_JOOQ_SCALA=-Djavadoc=jOOQ-javadoc/jooq-scala-$VERSION-javadoc.jar
fi

if [ -f jOOQ-src/jooq-$VERSION-sources.jar ]; then
  SOURCES_JOOQ=-Dsources=jOOQ-src/jooq-$VERSION-sources.jar
  SOURCES_JOOQ_META=-Dsources=jOOQ-src/jooq-meta-$VERSION-sources.jar
  SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN=-Dsources=jOOQ-src/jooq-codegen-$VERSION-sources.jar
  SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN=-Dsources=jOOQ-src/jooq-codegen-maven-$VERSION-sources.jar
  SOURCES_JOOQ_SCALA=-Dsources=jOOQ-src/jooq-scala-$VERSION-sources.jar
fi

mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-pom/pom.xml                         -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-parent        -DrepositoryId=$REPOSITORY -Durl=$URL -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=pom
mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib/jooq-$VERSION.jar               -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq               -DrepositoryId=$REPOSITORY -Durl=$URL -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=jar $JAVADOC_JOOQ               $SOURCES_JOOQ              -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom/jooq/pom.xml
mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib/jooq-meta-$VERSION.jar          -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-meta          -DrepositoryId=$REPOSITORY -Durl=$URL -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=jar $JAVADOC_JOOQ_META          $SOURCES_JOOQ_META         -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom/jooq-meta/pom.xml
mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib/jooq-codegen-$VERSION.jar       -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-codegen       -DrepositoryId=$REPOSITORY -Durl=$URL -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=jar $JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN       $SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN      -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom/jooq-codegen/pom.xml
mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib/jooq-codegen-maven-$VERSION.jar -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-codegen-maven -DrepositoryId=$REPOSITORY -Durl=$URL -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=jar $JAVADOC_JOOQ_CODEGEN_MAVEN $SOURCES_JOOQ_CODEGEN_META -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom/jooq-codegen-maven/pom.xml
mvn deploy:deploy-file -Dfile=jOOQ-lib/jooq-scala-$VERSION.jar         -DgroupId=org.jooq -DartifactId=jooq-scala         -DrepositoryId=$REPOSITORY -Durl=$URL -Dversion=$VERSION -Dpackaging=jar $JAVADOC_JOOQ_SCALA         $SOURCES_JOOQ_SCALA        -DpomFile=jOOQ-pom/jooq-scala/pom.xml

Again, more up to date versions of these scripts can be found here:
https://github.com/jOOQ/jOOQ/tree/master/jOOQ-release/release/template

The way to go

In an actual project setup, obviously, neither of the above approaches will be sufficient, and you’ll probably import the libraries into your local Nexus or Bintray or whatever repository you’re using. Just beware of potential restrictions on distribution that commercial deliverables may have.

A small tutorial about how to install artefacts into Nexus can be found here.