The 5 Golden Rules of Giving Awesome Customer Support

This is usually a tech blog, but every now and then, we make an exception when there’s something important to say.

Today, I’m going to criticise a lot of our industry’s understanding of support.

Who is this article for?

It’s for every software engineer giving support to users and/or customers, and every manager who works with software engineers. In fact, it isn’t restricted to software, but since this is a Java blog, let’s pretend it is only about software.

#1: All users are customers

While we’re at it, let’s use the terms “users” and “customers” as synonyms, because every user should be treated like a paying customer. In fact, every user should be treated like the only paying customer you have, on which your whole business depends. This is why I will put “customer” in quotes in this article.

This is something you should constantly remind yourself of. It doesn’t matter if your “customer” paid you millions for your software, or if they just use your quick and dirty Open Source library that you implemented in your free time.

Why is that? Because it’s your fault and problem as a vendor if you chose some business model (or if you don’t even have a business model) that generates (excessive?) support work. Change the model. Make more non-paying “customers” pay for support. Help them understand the value they’re getting from being your paying customers. Or keep doing stuff for free, it doesn’t matter as long as you will remember that it’s your problem, not theirs.

Always take Apple as a shining example. Apple customers love to pay excessive amounts for average hardware and software with nice-looking design. This has nothing to do with support, it just shows that Apple has gotten making customers pay right. Because Apple users want to be paying customers.

#2: Your customer took the time

Remember this:

Your “customer” took the time to report an issue.

Period. That’s all there is to say. When a “customer” gets in touch with you, they took the time to get in touch. So you should be thankful they took the time. Not all “customers” take the time. Most of them just rant and leave you silently if something goes wrong. Or worse, they rant in public and then leave you.

If a “customer” does take the time, this means they stand for thousands of others who don’t take the time but like your product and want to continue liking it. Don’t spoil that. Keep those customers!

#3: Your customer is abrasive and demanding

The food chain goes this way round. Accept that. Moreover, remember: You’re not some divine entity that grants an audience to an unworthy soul who should kneel before thy wisdom. You’re the supplier. They’re the customer. They’re the king. You’re the servant.

Of course they are abrasive and demanding. They are the “customer”. They had a bad day. They have an idiot boss. Their job sucks. They work on legacy code. They blame you (and everyone else). It’s not their fault. It never was.

So what? That happens from time to time. More often than not, however, “customers” are nice people, and again: They took the time to get in touch.

So, your job is to thank them for that. To make sure you do everything needed to help them. To solve their trouble and issues. Which often isn’t what they’re saying. They just want you to listen. A workaround might just be enough. They’ll understand you can’t fix things immediately. But do help them.

#4: Your customer doesn’t understand your product

You’ve spent all that time with your product. You know exactly how it works. You have accepted all the caveats. The bugs. The workarounds.

Your customer doesn’t. They have more important things to do than reverse engineer your funky product. If they don’t understand something, always assume it’s your fault. You could improve the product. Or the documentation. Or your SEO to make sure they will find the documentation. Or your support channels (see below). Whatever. Always assume that your “customer” doesn’t have the time to really understand your product. Why should they.

Learn from your “customers”. Their misunderstanding of your ways is your chance to do it better. Every single time.

#5: Your customer doesn’t care about your workflows

And here’s the one thing you must never, NEVER do:

NEVER tell your “customer” that they’ve used the wrong support channel

NEVER do the above. They’ll learn by themselves after a while. Or they don’t. Does it matter? It doesn’t. They’ve taken the time to reach out and that ought to be enough.

Perhaps, you’ve chosen a confusing setup of support channels. Or complicated products (looking at you, Bugzilla). Improve it, then. Make it easier for your “customers” to choose the right support channel if they have gotten it “wrong”.

What does wrong support channel even mean? Wrong support channels create administrative work to you. You have to copy a bug report from Google Groups to JIRA. From your E-Mail program to GitHub. Etc.

So, a “customer” has reported a bug on the discussion group. You prefer they create an issue in an issue tracker. How do you react?

  • Bad: This is a bug not a discussion, we have a bug tracker for this. Can you please create an issue??!?
  • Good: Thank you very much for bringing this to our attention. I have registered an issue #717863 for this problem. We’re looking into this as quickly as possible and let you know about our progress. If there’s anything … blah blah.

As simple as that.


There are many more things that help you get support right. And it isn’t always easy. Sometimes, it’s just too hard to get it right. We all have tons of things to do. And priorities.

But remember one thing. This is (almost) never the “customer”‘s fault. And even if it is, you should never make them feel as if it were. There are enough enterprise-y companies out there whose processes are too complex and heavy to ever give awesome support.

Don’t be like those companies. Be awesome for your “customers”.

5 thoughts on “The 5 Golden Rules of Giving Awesome Customer Support

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