Java 8 Friday: Language Design is Subtle

At Data Geekery, we love Java. And as we're really into jOOQ's fluent API and query DSL, we're absolutely thrilled about what Java 8 will bring to our ecosystem. Java 8 Friday Every Friday, we're showing you a couple of nice new tutorial-style Java 8 features, which take advantage of lambda expressions, extension methods, and … Continue reading Java 8 Friday: Language Design is Subtle

Java 8 Friday: The Dark Side of Java 8

At Data Geekery, we love Java. And as we're really into jOOQ's fluent API and query DSL, we're absolutely thrilled about what Java 8 will bring to our ecosystem. Java 8 Friday Every Friday, we're showing you a couple of nice new tutorial-style Java 8 features, which take advantage of lambda expressions, extension methods, and … Continue reading Java 8 Friday: The Dark Side of Java 8

Java 8 Friday Goodies: Local Transaction Scope

At Data Geekery, we love Java. And as we're really into jOOQ's fluent API and query DSL, we're absolutely thrilled about what Java 8 will bring to our ecosystem. We have blogged a couple of times about some nice Java 8 goodies, and now we feel it's time to start a new blog series, the... … Continue reading Java 8 Friday Goodies: Local Transaction Scope

Java 8 Friday Goodies: Lambdas and Sorting

At Data Geekery, we love Java. And as we're really into jOOQ's fluent API and query DSL, we're absolutely thrilled about what Java 8 will bring to our ecosystem. We have blogged a couple of times about some nice Java 8 goodies, and now we feel it's time to start a new blog series, the... … Continue reading Java 8 Friday Goodies: Lambdas and Sorting

Java 8 Friday Goodies: Lambdas and XML

At Data Geekery, we love Java. And as we're really into jOOQ's fluent API and query DSL, we're absolutely thrilled about what Java 8 will bring to our ecosystem. We have blogged a couple of times about some nice Java 8 goodies, and now we feel it's time to start a new blog series, the... … Continue reading Java 8 Friday Goodies: Lambdas and XML

Where’s the Self-Confidence when Advertising Java 8, Oracle?

I have often wondered, why the team around Brian Goetz has been heading towards a “decent compromise” so strongly from the beginning, both from a marketing AND technical point of view, instead of adding more boldness to how Java 8 is advertised. At Devoxx Belgium 2013, Brian Goetz seems to have really sold his accomplishments … Continue reading Where’s the Self-Confidence when Advertising Java 8, Oracle?

Does Java 8 Still Need LINQ? Or is it Better than LINQ?

LINQ was one of the best things that happened to the .NET software engineering ecosystem in a long time. With its introduction of lambda expressions and monads in Visual Studio 2008, it had catapulted the C# language way ahead of Java, which was at version 6 at the time, still discussing the pros and cons of … Continue reading Does Java 8 Still Need LINQ? Or is it Better than LINQ?

JDK 8: State of the Collections

Here's the latest publication by Brian Goetz, Oracle's project lead for JSR 335, a.k.a. Project Lambda. Here's a nice example showing new collection features, such as "Streams" using method references: List<String> strings = ... int sumOfLengths = strings.stream() .map(String::length) .reduce(0, Integer::plus); Another nice example showing the use of lambda expressions: int sum = shapes.stream() .filter(s … Continue reading JDK 8: State of the Collections

When will we have LINQ in Java?

LINQ is one of Microsoft's .NET Framework's most distinct language features. When it was first introduced to languages such as C#, it required heavy changes to the language specification. Yet, this addition was extremely powerful and probably unequalled by other languages / platforms, such as Java, Scala, etc. Granted, Scala has integrated XML in a similar fashion into … Continue reading When will we have LINQ in Java?

Array, list, set, map, tuple, record literals in Java

Occasionally, when I'm thrilled by the power and expressiveness of JavaScript, I find myself missing one or two features in the Java world. Apart from lambda expressions / closures or whatever you want to call "anonymous functions", it's the use of advanced literals for common data types, such as arrays, lists, sets, maps, etc. In … Continue reading Array, list, set, map, tuple, record literals in Java