How to Speed Up Apache Xalan’s XPath Processor by Factor 10x

There has been a bit of an awkward bug in Apache Xalan for a while now, and that bug is XALANJ-2540. The effect of this bug is that an internal SPI configuration file is loaded by Xalan thousands of times per XPath expression evaluation, which can be measured easily as such:

this:

Element e = (Element)
  document.getElementsByTagName("SomeElementName")
          .item(0);
String result = ((Element) e).getTextContent();

Seems to be an incredible 100x faster than this:

// Accounts for 30%, can be cached
XPathFactory factory = XPathFactory.newInstance();

// Negligible
XPath xpath = factory.newXPath();

// Negligible
XPathExpression expression =
  xpath.compile("//SomeElementName");

// Accounts for 70%
String result = (String) expression
  .evaluate(document, XPathConstants.STRING);

It can be seen that every one of the 10k test XPath evaluations led to the classloader trying to lookup the DTMManager instance in some sort of default configuration. This configuration is not loaded into memory but accessed every time. Furthermore, this access seems to be protected by a lock on the ObjectFactory.class itself. When the access fails (by default), then the configuration is loaded from the xalan.jar file’s configuration file:

META-INF/service/org.apache.xml.dtm.DTMManager

Every time!:

A profiling session on Xalan

Fortunately, this behaviour can be overridden by specifying a JVM parameter like this:

-Dorg.apache.xml.dtm.DTMManager=
  org.apache.xml.dtm.ref.DTMManagerDefault

or

-Dcom.sun.org.apache.xml.internal.dtm.DTMManager=
  com.sun.org.apache.xml.internal.dtm.ref.DTMManagerDefault

The above works, as this will allow to bypass the expensive work in lookUpFactoryClassName() if the factory class name is the default anyway:

// Code from c.s.o.a.xml.internal.dtm.ObjectFactory
static String lookUpFactoryClassName(
       String factoryId,
       String propertiesFilename,
       String fallbackClassName) {
  SecuritySupport ss = SecuritySupport
    .getInstance();

  try {
    String systemProp = ss
      .getSystemProperty(factoryId);
    if (systemProp != null) { 

      // Return early from the method
      return systemProp;
    }
  } catch (SecurityException se) {
  }

  // [...] "Heavy" operations later

References

The above text is an extract from a Stack Overflow question and answer that I’ve contributed to the public a while ago. I’m posting it again, here on my blog, such that the community’s awareness for this rather heavy bug can be raised. Feel free to upvote on this ticket here, as every Sun/Oracle JDK on this planet is affected:

https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/XALANJ-2540

Contributing a fix to Apache would be even better, of course…

Conference Gem: The MEDIT Symposium

The MEDIT Symposium is one of this year’s international conference gems that you shouldn’t miss, if you’re into Open Source! It features three very interesting tracks

  • Cloud Computing
  • Open Source
  • Mobile Development

I’m delighted to line up my own talk about jOOQ with Apache committers (Cassandra, Cordova, Isis), Groovy Language Toolkit developers, researchers and book authors. This mix of topics will certainly lead to inspiring discussions at lunch and at the later happy hour.

Apart from the fact that the admission fee is very reasonable, there’s nothing like an escape from cold northern October to Sicilly, southern Italy:

I’m looking forward to meeting you numerously at the MEDIT Symposium in October 2013!

How to Behave on Mailing Lists

I recently stumbled upon the following document:
http://www.apache.org/dev/contrib-email-tips.html

It’s a useful list of rules, ideas about how to behave on open source mailing lists. Of course, these rules include both committers and users ;-)