10 Java Articles Everyone Must Read


One month ago, we’ve published a list of 10 SQL Articles Everyone Must Read. A list of articles that we believe would add exceptional value to our readers on the jOOQ blog. The jOOQ blog is a blog focusing on both Java and SQL, so it is only natural that today, one month later, we’re publishing an equally exciting list of 10 Java articles everyone must read.

Note that by “must read”, we may not specifically mean the particular linked article only, but also other works from the same authors, who have been regular bloggers over the past years and never failed to produce new interesting content!

Here goes…

1. Brian Goetz: “Stewardship: the Sobering Parts”

The first blog post is actually not a blog post but a recording of a very interesting talk by Brian Goetz on Oracle’s stewardship of Java. On the jOOQ blog, we’ve been slightly critical about 1-2 features of the Java language in the past, e.g. when comparing it to Scala, or Ceylon.

Brian makes good points about why it would not be a good idea for Java to become just as “modern” as quickly as other languages. A must-watch for every Java developer (around 1h)

2. Aleksey Shipilёv: The Black Magic of (Java) Method Dispatch

In recent years, the JVM has seen quite a few improvements, including invokedynamic that arrived in Java 7 as a prerequisite for Java 8 lambdas, as well as a great tool for other, more dynamic languages built on top of the JVM, such as Nashorn.

invokedynamic is only a small, “high level” puzzle piece in the advanced trickery performed by the JVM. What really happens under the hood when you call methods? How are they resolved, optimised by the JIT? Aleksey’s article sub-title reveals what the article is really about:

“Everything you wanted to know about Black Deviously Surreptitious Magic in low-level performance engineering”

Definitely not a simple read, but a great post to learn about the power of the JVM.

Read Aleksey’s “The Black Magic of (Java) Method Dispatch

3. Oliver White: Java Tools and Technologies Landscape for 2014

We’re already in 2015, but this report by Oliver White (at the time head of ZeroTurnaround’s RebelLabs) had been exceptionally well executed and touches pretty much everything related to the Java ecosystem.

Read Oliver’s “Java Tools and Technologies Landscape for 2014

4. Peter Lawrey: Java Lambdas and Low Latency

When Aleksey has introduced us to some performance semantics in the JVM, Peter takes this one step further, talking about low latency in Java 8. We could have picked many other useful little blog posts from Peter’s blog, which is all about low-latency, high performance computing on the JVM, sometimes even doing advanced off-heap trickery.

Read Peter’s “Java Lambdas and Low Latency

5. Nicolai Parlog: Everything You Need To Know About Default Methods

Nicolai is a newcomer in the Java blogosphere, and a very promising one, too. His well-researched articles go in-depth about some interesting facts related to Java 8, digging out old e-mails from the expert group’s mailing list, explaining the decisions they made to conclude with what we call Java 8 today.

Read Nicolai’s “Everything You Need To Know About Default Methods

6. Lukas Eder: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Java

This list wouldn’t be complete without listing another list that we wrote ourselves on the jOOQ blog. Java is an old beast with 20 years of history this year in 2015. This old beast has a lot of secrets and caveats that many people have forgotten or never thought about. We’ve uncovered them for you:

Read Lukas’s “10 Things You Didn’t Know About Java

7. Edwin Dalorzo: Why There Is Interface Pollution in Java 8

Edwin has been responding to our own blog posts a couple of times in the past with very well researched and thoroughly thought through articles, in particular about Java 8 related features, e.g. comparing Java 8 Streams with LINQ (something that we’ve done ourselves, as well).

This particular article explains why there are so many different and differently named functional interfaces in Java 8.

Read Edwin’s “Why There Is Interface Pollution in Java 8

8. Vlad Mihalcea: How Does PESSIMISTIC_FORCE_INCREMENT Lock Mode Work

When Java talks to databases, many people default to using Hibernate for convenience (see also 3. Oliver White: Java Tools and Technologies Landscape for 2014). Hibernate’s main vision, however, is not to add convenience – you can get that in many other ways as well. Hibernate’s main vision is to provide powerful means of navigating and persisting an object graph representation of your RDBMS’s data model, including various ways of locking.

Vlad is an extremely proficient Hibernate user, who has a whole blog series on how Hibernate works going. We’ve picked a recent, well-researched article about locking, but we strongly suggest you read the other articles as well:

Read Vlad’s “How Does PESSIMISTIC_FORCE_INCREMENT Lock Mode Work

9. Petri Kainulainen: Writing Clean Tests

This isn’t a purely Java-related blog post, although it is written from the perspective of a Java developer. Modern development involves testing – automatic testing – and lots of it. Petri has written an interesting blog series about writing clean tests in Java – you shouldn’t miss his articles!

Read Petri’s “Writing Clean Tests

10. Eugen Paraschiv: Java 8 Resources Collection

If you don’t already have at least 9 open tabs with interesting stuff to read after this list, get ready for a browser tab explosion! Eugen Paraschiv who maintains baeldung.com has been collecting all sorts of very interesting resources related to Java 8 in a single link collection. You should definitely bookmark this collection and check back frequently for interesting changes:

Read Eugen’s “Java 8 Resources Collection

Many other articles

There are, of course, many other very good articles providing deep insight into useful Java tricks. If you find you’ve encountered an article that would nicely complement this list, please leave a link and description in the comments section. Future readers will appreciate the additional insight.

Java 8 Friday: The Best Java 8 Resources – Your Weekend is Booked


At Data Geekery, we love Java. And as we’re really into jOOQ’s fluent API and query DSL, we’re absolutely thrilled about what Java 8 will bring to our ecosystem.

Every Friday, we’re showing you a couple of nice new tutorial-style Java 8 features, which take advantage of lambda expressions, method references, default methods, the Streams API, and other great stuff. You’ll find the source code on GitHub.

The Best Java 8 Resources – Your Weekend is Booked

We’re obviously not the only ones writing about Java 8. Ever since this great language update’s go live, there had been blogs all around the world appearing with great content and different perspectives on the subject. In this edition of the Java 8 Friday series, we’d like to summarise some of the best content that has been going on on that subject.

1. Brian Goetz’s Answers on Stack Overflow

Brian Goetz was the spec lead for JSR 335. Together with his Expert Group team, he has worked very hard to help Java 8 succeed. However, now that JSR 335 has shipped, his work is far from being over. Brian has had the courtesy of giving authoritative answers to questions from the Java community on Stack Overflow. Here are some of the most interesting questions:

Thumbs up to this great community effort. It cannot get any better than hearing authoritative answers from the spec lead himself.

2. Baeldung.com’s Collection of Java 8 Resources

This list of resources wouldn’t be complete without the very useful list of Java 8 resources (mostly authoritative links to specifications) from the guys over at Baeldung.com. Here is:

http://www.baeldung.com/java8

3. The jOOQ Blog’s Java 8 Friday Series

Yay, that’s us! 🙂

Yes, we’ve worked hard to bring you the latest from our experience when integrating jOOQ with Java 8. Here are some of our most popular articles from the recent months:

4. ZeroTurnaround’s RebelLabs Blog

As part of the ZeroTurnaround content marketing strategy, ZeroTurnaround has launched RebelLabs quite a while ago where various writers publish interesting articles around the topic of Java, which aren’t necessarily related to JRebel and other ZT products. There is some great Java 8 related content having been published over there. Here are our favourite gems:

5. The Takipi Blog

Just like ZeroTurnaround and ourselves, our friends over at Takipi provide you with some awesome Java 8 content on their blog.

6. Benji Weber’s Fun Experiments with Java 8

This blog series we found particularly fun to read. Benji Weber really thinks outside of the box and does some crazy things with default methods, method references and all that. Things that Java developers could only dream of, so far. Here are:

7. The Geeks from Paradise Blog’s Java 8 Musings

Edwin Dalorzo from Informatech has been treating us with a variety of well-founded comparisons between Java 8 and .NET. This is particularly interesting when comparing Streams with LINQ. Here are some of his best writings:

Is this list complete?

No, it is missing many other, very interesting blog series. Do you have a series to share? We’re more than happy to update this post, just let us know (in the comments section)

Java 8 Friday: The Dark Side of Java 8


At Data Geekery, we love Java. And as we’re really into jOOQ’s fluent API and query DSL, we’re absolutely thrilled about what Java 8 will bring to our ecosystem.

Java 8 Friday

Every Friday, we’re showing you a couple of nice new tutorial-style Java 8 features, which take advantage of lambda expressions, extension methods, and other great stuff. You’ll find the source code on GitHub.

The dark side of Java 8

So far, we’ve been showing the thrilling parts of this new major release. But there are also caveats. Lots of them. Things that

  • … are confusing
  • … are wrong
  • … are omitted (for now)
  • … are omitted (for long)

There are always two sides to Java major releases. On the bright side, we get lots of new functionality that most people would say was overdue. Other languages, platforms have had generics long before Java 5. Other languages, platforms have had lambdas long before Java 8. But now, we finally have these features. In the usual quirky Java-way.

Lambda expressions were introduced quite elegantly. The idea of being able to write every anonymous SAM instance as a lambda expression is very compelling from a backwards-compatiblity point of view. So what are the dark sides to Java 8?

Overloading gets even worse

Overloading, generics, and varargs aren’t friends. We’ve explained this in a previous article, and also in this Stack Overflow question. These might not be every day problems in your odd application, but they’re very important problems for API designers and maintainers.

With lambda expressions, things get “worse”. So you think you can provide some convenience API, overloading your existing run() method that accepts a Callable to also accept the new Supplier type:

static <T> T run(Callable<T> c) throws Exception {
    return c.call();
}

static <T> T run(Supplier<T> s) throws Exception {
    return s.get();
}

What looks like perfectly useful Java 7 code is a major pain in Java 8, now. Because you cannot just simply call these methods with a lambda argument:

public static void main(String[] args)
throws Exception {
    run(() -> null);
    //  ^^^^^^^^^^ ambiguous method call
}

Tough luck. You’ll have to resort to either of these “classic” solutions:

    run((Callable<Object>) (() -> null));
    run(new Callable<Object>() {
        @Override
        public Object call() throws Exception {
            return null;
        }
    });

So, while there’s always a workaround, these workarounds always “suck”. That’s quite a bummer, even if things don’t break from a backwards-compatibility perspective.

Not all keywords are supported on default methods

Default methods are a nice addition. Some may claim that Java finally has traits. Others clearly dissociate themselves from the term, e.g. Brian Goetz:

The key goal of adding default methods to Java was “interface evolution”, not “poor man’s traits.”

As found on the lambda-dev mailing list.

Fact is, default methods are quite a bit of an orthogonal and irregular feature to anything else in Java. Here are a couple of critiques:

They cannot be made final

Given that default methods can also be used as convenience methods in API:

public interface NoTrait {

    // Run the Runnable exactly once
    default final void run(Runnable r) {
        //  ^^^^^ modifier final not allowed
        run(r, 1);
    }

    // Run the Runnable "times" times
    default void run(Runnable r, int times) {
        for (int i = 0; i < times; i++)
            r.run();
    }
}

Unfortunately, the above is not possible, and so the first overloaded convenience method could be overridden in subtypes, even if that makes no sense to the API designer.

They cannot be made synchronized

Bummer! Would that have been difficult to implement in the language?

public interface NoTrait {
    default synchronized void noSynchronized() {
        //  ^^^^^^^^^^^^ modifier synchronized
        //  not allowed
        System.out.println("noSynchronized");
    }
}

Yes, synchronized is used rarely, just like final. But when you have that use-case, why not just allow it? What makes interface method bodies so special?

The default keyword

This is maybe the weirdest and most irregular of all features. The default keyword itself. Let’s compare interfaces and abstract classes:


// Interfaces are always abstract
public /* abstract */ interface NoTrait {

    // Abstract methods have no bodies
    // The abstract keyword is optional
    /* abstract */ void run1();

    // Concrete methods have bodies
    // The default keyword is mandatory
    default void run2() {}
}

// Classes can optionally be abstract
public abstract class NoInterface {

    // Abstract methods have no bodies
    // The abstract keyword is mandatory
    abstract void run1();

    // Concrete methods have bodies
    // The default keyword mustn't be used
    void run2() {}
}

If the language were re-designed from scratch, it would probably do without any of abstract or default keywords. Both are unnecessary. The mere fact that there is or is not a body is sufficient information for the compiler to assess whether a method is abstract. I.e, how things should be:

public interface NoTrait {
    void run1();
    void run2() {}
}

public abstract class NoInterface {
    void run1();
    void run2() {}
}

The above would be much leaner and more regular. It’s a pity that the usefulness of default was never really debated by the EG. Well, it was debated but the EG never wanted to accept this as an option. I’ve tried my luck, with this response:

I don’t think #3 is an option because interfaces with method bodies are unnatural to begin with. At least specifying the “default” keyword gives the reader some context why the language allows a method body. Personally, I wish interfaces would remain as pure contracts (without implementation), but I don’t know of a better option to evolve interfaces.

Again, this is a clear commitment by the EG not to commit to the vision of “traits” in Java. Default methods were a pure necessary means to implement 1-2 other features. They weren’t well-designed from the beginning.

Other modifiers

Luckily, the static modifier made it into the specs, late in the project. It is thus possible to specifiy static methods in interfaces now. For some reason, though, these methods do not need (nor allow!) the default keyword, which must’ve been a totally random decision by the EG, just like you apparently cannot define static final methods in interfaces.

While visibility modifiers were discussed on the lambda-dev mailing list, but were out of scope for this release. Maybe, we can get them in a future release.

Few default methods were actually implemented

Some methods would have sensible default implementations on interface – one might guess. Intuitively, the collections interfaces, like List or Set would have them on their equals() and hashCode() methods, because the contract for these methods is well-defined on the interfaces. It is also implemented in AbstractList, using listIterator(), which is a reasonable default implementation for most tailor-made lists.

It would’ve been great if these API were retrofitted to make implementing custom collections easier with Java 8. I could make all my business objects implement List for instance, without wasting the single base-class inheritance on AbstractList.

Probably, though, there has been a compelling reason related to backwards-compatibility that prevented the Java 8 team at Oracle from implementing these default methods. Whoever sends us the reason why this was omitted will get a free jOOQ sticker 🙂

The wasn’t invented here – mentality

This, too, was criticised a couple of times on the lambda-dev EG mailing list. And while writing this blog series, I can only confirm that the new functional interfaces are very confusing to remember. They’re confusing for these reasons:

Some primitive types are more equal than others

The int, long, double primitive types are preferred compared to all the others, in that they have a functional interface in the java.util.function package, and in the whole Streams API. boolean is a second-class citizen, as it still made it into the package in the form of a BooleanSupplier or a Predicate, or worse: IntPredicate.

All the other primitive types don’t really exist in this area. I.e. there are no special types for byte, short, float, and char. While the argument of meeting deadlines is certainly a valid one, this quirky status-quo will make the language even harder to learn for newbies.

The types aren’t just called Function

Let’s be frank. All of these types are simply “functions”. No one really cares about the implicit difference between a Consumer, a Predicate, a UnaryOperator, etc.

In fact, when you’re looking for a type with a non-void return value and two arguments, what would you probably be calling it? Function2? Well, you were wrong. It is called a BiFunction.

Here’s a decision tree to know how the type you’re looking for is called:

  • Does your function return void? It’s called a Consumer
  • Does your function return boolean? It’s called a Predicate
  • Does your function return an int, long, double? It’s called XXToIntYY, XXToLongYY, XXToDoubleYY something
  • Does your function take no arguments? It’s called a Supplier
  • Does your function take a single int, long, double argument? It’s called an IntXX, LongXX, DoubleXX something
  • Does your function take two arguments? It’s called BiXX
  • Does your function take two arguments of the same type? It’s called BinaryOperator
  • Does your function return the same type as it takes as a single argument? It’s called UnaryOperator
  • Does your function take two arguments of which the first is a reference type and the second is a primitive type? It’s called ObjXXConsumer (only consumers exist with that configuration)
  • Else: It’s called Function

Good lord! We should certainly go over to Oracle Education to check if the price for Oracle Certified Java Programmer courses have drastically increased, recently… Thankfully, with Lambda expressions, we hardly ever have to remember all these types!

More on Java 8

Java 5 generics have brought a lot of great new features to the Java language. But there were also quite a few caveats related to type erasure. Java 8’s default methods, Streams API and lambda expressions will again bring a lot of great new features to the Java language and platform. But we’re sure that Stack Overflow will soon burst with questions by confused programmers that are getting lost in the Java 8 jungle.

Learning all the new features won’t be easy, but the new features (and caveats) are here to stay. If you’re a Java developer, you better start practicing now, when you get the chance. Because we have a long way to go.

Nonetheless, thigns are exciting, so stay tuned for more exciting Java 8 stuff published in this blog series.

Are you in for another critique about Java 8? Read “New Parallelism APIs in Java 8: Behind the Glitz and Glamour” by the guys over

Syntax for calling “super” in Java 8 Defender methods


This is a very interesting discussion. How to reference default methods from implemented interfaces throughout the class / interface hierarchy?

Situation:

interface K {
  int m() default { return 88; }
}

interface J extends K {
  int m() default { return K.super.m(); }
                        // ^^^^^^^^^^^^ How to express this?
}

Solution ideas:

  • K.super.m()
  • super.K.m()
  • ((K) super).m()
  • K::m()
  • K.default.m()
  • super<K>.m()
  • super(K).m()
  • super(K.class).m()
  • super[K].m()

Any other crazy ideas? See the discussion here:

http://mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/lambda-dev/2012-August/005616.html

Survey about the Java 8 “default method” syntax


Influence the future of Java now! Participate in this official survey by Brian Goetz:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/9VPJZQQ