jOOQ Newsletter: June 18, 2014 – jOOQ goes JavaOne™

jOOQ Goes JavaOne™

We’re super excited to announce that our CEO and Head of R&D Lukas will be heading to San Francisco this fall to talk about jOOQ at JavaOne™! This is not just great for Data Geekery and jOOQ, but also for the whole Java / SQL ecosystem, as we believe that the Java / SQL integration deserves much more focus at conferences, where buzzwords like Big Data and NoSQL dominate the agenda disproportionally.

From our perspective, the JVM is the best platform for general purpose languages, whereas SQL is the best tool for database interaction – with Oracle SQL being a leader in the industry. So…

2014 will be a great year for Java and SQL

Prior to JavaOne™, we have also been talking at the awesome 33rd Degree and GeekOut conferences, the latter having been hosted by our friends over at ZeroTurnaround who have launched XRebel, a very promising tool to help you find rogue SQL statements in your application. Stay tuned as we’ll be trying out XRebel to compare jOOQ with Hibernate on our blog, soon.

Stay informed about 2014 events on www.jooq.org/news.

Tweet of the Day

Our customers, users, and followers are sharing their love for jOOQ with the world and we can hardly catch up with them! Here are:

Alessio Harri, who is having a great time using OpenJPA (the workhorse) with jOOQ (the artist)

The Vertabelo team over at e-point, who like using jOOQ as a database consumer for their SaaS, collaborative ERD tool.

Petri Kainulainen, who is working around performance problems by getting back in control of his SQL.

Thanks for the shouts, guys! You make the jOOQ experience rock!

Upcoming License Improvements

From our recent negotiations with site license leads, we’ve come to two conclusions that will benefit all of the jOOQ Professional and jOOQ Enterprise customer base.

  • When you buy a car or a TV, you probably don’t run to the supplier every time you encounter a small defect that prevents you from fully enjoying your product. You’ll fix it yourself. We want to do the same in the future. As we trust our customers, and as we already ship our sources, we will soon allow you to implement urgent fixes to jOOQ yourselves, as we believe that this will improve the jOOQ experience for everyone and add further value to your own experience.
  • We understand the requirements of purchasing departments in large organisations. Often, it is easier to purchase a site license from a supplier rather than going through the hassles of adapting workstation-based subscriptions all the time. To respond to this need, we’ll soon publish a discounted, tiered pricing model for large-volume purchases of our perpetual licenses.

Both of these improvements will be deployed to all of our customer base in the beginning of July.

Do you already have any questions regarding what will change / improve? Do not hesitate to contact us.

Community Zone – The jOOQ aficionados have been active!

The jOOQ community has been very active again in the last month. We’re happy to point out these editor’s picks from our radar:

Vlad Mihalcea is a very active blogger on the subject of Hibernate integrations, transaction mangagement and connection pooling performance. We’re looking forward to his future blog posts about how to integrate ORMs with SQL/jOOQ, e.g. by applying emerging architecture patterns such as CQRS. One of his most recent, very interesting blog posts deals precisely with that subject.

Micha Kops has been blogging about a variety of Java tool integrations and has now published this comprehensive and very useful jOOQ tutorial. It is great to see fresh opinions from people just getting to know the platform and blogging about it.

SQL Zone – More common SQL mistakes

Our popular blog series “Top 10 mistakes Java developers make when writing SQL”has been enhanced with yet another must-read article for the Java/SQL community:

Did you know about all those common mistakes? We bet you didn’t. If you haven’t seen enough, see also our previous articles:

SQL Zone – Don’t roll your own OFFSET pagination emulation

One of the great reasons why you should use jOOQ is the fact that jOOQ abstracts away all the hard parts of your SQL dialect. If you’re using Oracle (prior to 12c), SQL Server (prior to 2012), or DB2, you might need to emulate what other databases know as OFFSET pagination. While most people get the simple use-cases right, we’ve tried to outline all of the other issues that may arise when you try to do it yourself in our blog post:

A must-read for all SQL transformation aficionados.

Feedback zone

You’ve read to the end of this newsletter, that’s great! Did you like it? What did we do great? What can we improve? What other subjects would you like us to cover?

We’d love to hear from you, so if you want to reach out to us, just drop a message to contact@datageekery.com. Looking forward to hearing from you!

An Open Source License to Increase Your Street Credibility

Many of us geeks don’t really care about users, tractions, etc. when we spam GitHub with our little toy projects. I mean, who knows if we really have the time to maintain them? Certainly, there’s almost no money in it anyway, so we might just as well give it away for free (e.g. jOOX).

Nonetheless, you should choose a license to show your intent. But which license to choose? Jeff Atwood says “Any License”. He then goes on to recommend the WTFPL or Do What The Fuck You Want Public License. I mean, this is just like arbitrarily throwing software around you in the streets:

But we claim that there is another, much better license for this kind of useless little toy project. It’s called Beerware. The license text reads:

/*
 * ------------------------------------------------
 * "THE BEER-WARE LICENSE" (Revision 42):
 *  wrote this file. As long as 
 * you retain this notice you can do whatever you 
 * want with this stuff. If we meet some day, and 
 * you think this stuff is worth it, you can buy
 * me a beer in return [Your Name Here]
 * ------------------------------------------------
 */

So, when you’re in for some street credibility, give this some serious thought!

Increase your street credibility, use the beerware license
tweet this

… just kidding. Use the ASL 2.0 and/or the CC-BY 3.0

jOOQ Newsletter December 13, 2013

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A jOOQ Runtime Only Distribution

Several of our customers have made us aware of the fact that they don’t really need the jOOQ code generator, only the SQL builder / query DSL API and possibly the SQL execution functionality. In the next weeks, we’ll be working towards a new “jOOQ Runtime Only Distribution” that will ship at a lower price. Concretely, we’ll be giving those customers a 25% discount on the regular distributions for any of jOOQ Express, jOOQ Professional, and jOOQ Enterprise.

Obviously, we recommend to use jOOQ’s code generator to profit from the full feature scope that we offer.

License Amendments

We have updated our commercial license to improve your legal relationship with Data Geekery. Essentially, these things have been amended:

  • Definitions: We have added the missing definition of what is a “Minor Defect”
  • 6.2 Distribution Right: The distribution right section now grants you a perpetual license to distribute the software, instead of a timely limited one. This will allow you to continue to distribute, embed and use jOOQ in your End-user Application even if you terminate your Developer Workstation License Agreement with us. You will, however, still need to license jOOQ in order to maintain your End-user Application.
  • 7.1.1 Remedial Services: The remedial services section now formally defines how Minor Defects are remedied

As this updated license grants new rights to our customers, it shall be in effect immediately also for existing jOOQ 3.2 customers.

Upcoming Events

We have recently presented jOOQ at the Java2Days conference in Sofia, Bulgaria as well as at the Java User Group Berlin-Brandenburg. Both talks have enjoyed a high attendance with lots of SQL developers challenging us with interesting questions. Of course, jOOQ responds to most questions already, as Manuel Bernhardt, another speaker has observed:

If you want us to talk about jOOQ or SQL near you, do not hesitate to contact us.

Here is an overview of other, upcoming events:

Stay informed about 2014 events on www.jooq.org/news. If you’re looking for the slides, they’re available for free under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license on SlideShare.

Using jOOQ with Hibernate

While jOOQ can be seen as a popular alternative to Hibernate, there is no stopping you from using both frameworks in the same application. While Hibernate heavily improves every day CRUD operations, jOOQ heavily improves writing SQL in Java. The two goals can be orthogonal and thus it may make perfect sense to combine the two.

Vlad Mihalcea, an enthusiastic jOOQ user, is writing up a series of blog posts on his blog about how to use jOOQ with Hibernate:

Gavin King himself chimed in on Google+ and confirmed once again that it was never his intention for Hibernate to be used for everything.

If you want to share your own experience of your jOOQ / Spring, jOOQ / Hibernate, jOOQ / Anything integration, let us know!

SQL Zone – “Lightning Fast SQL with Proper Indexing”

Understanding SQL and the history of SQL is of the essence when you want to get the best out of your relational database. This has recently been nicely explained by Markus Winand at the Oredev conference 2013. Luckily, his presentation has been recorded for free review.

More about the history of SQL can be seen in this interesting article about Codd’s Relational Vision – Has NoSQL Come Full Circle? It proves what we have been evangelising for a while, ourselves. NoSQL is not a new technology. It is more of a return to pre-Codd times when people did not have a powerful relational model to abstract their storage implementation away from their application. This article claims that Codd’s greatest achievement was the fact that he surpassed the deficiencies of early databases:

  • Access dependencies
  • Order dependencies
  • Index dependencies

Read the full article for a very interesting historic insight into the relational model, and why NoSQL might not be a good answer for most general problems.