Ceylon Might Just be the Only (JVM) Language that Got Nulls Right

Here we go again. THAT TOPIC.

But hang on. The approach discussed here (and in the Ceylon language) is not something you see every day. At the same time, it is very cunning.

Nulls are baked into the language

… or so it may seem. Indeed, in Ceylon, like in Kotlin (and possibly many other languages), there is a special type “annotation” that you can postfix to any reference type in order to make it nullable. For instance:

String firstName = "Homer";
String? middleName = "J";
String lastName = "Simpson";

In the above example, both firstName and lastName are mandatory values that can never be null, whereas middleName is optional. Most languages that support the above then ship with special operators to access the optional value, e.g. ?. in Ceylon and also in Kotlin.

// Another optional value:
Integer? length = middleName?.length;

// A non-optional value:
Integer length = middleName?.length else 0;

So, what is it about Ceylon that works so smoothly?

The thing that Ceylon got very right is the fact that all of the above is just syntactic sugar that is:

  • Easy to use
  • Maps well to our mindset, where null still is a thing
  • Can interoperate with Java
  • Doesn’t introduce cognitive friction

For us Java folks, we can still pretend that null is an OK-ish, hard to avoid thing (as we’ve claimed before on this blog). But what is null really? Is it the absent value? The unknown value? The uninitialised value?

Java only has one null thingy, and it is (ab-)used for all of the previous things, and more, when in theory, it is only really the uninitialised value, nothing more. On the other hand, when working with JDBC (and thus, SQL), it implicitly means the unknown value (with all the related caveats).

In Ceylon, however, Null is a special type, similar to Void in Java. The only value that can be assigned to the Null type is null:

// Ceylon
Null x = null;

// Java
Void x = null;

But the big difference is, null cannot be assigned to any other type! Wait. Couldn’t we assign null to String? … ? Of course, the following is possible in Ceylon:

String? x = null;

But why is this possible? Because String? is just syntax sugar for String|Null, a union type, i.e. a type that is either the String type or the Null type.

Huh, what are union types?

Let’s look at this more closely. When in the jOOQ API you want to work with SQL functions and expressions, there is always a great set of overloads that provide you with a standard version, and a convenience version where you can pass a bind variable. Take the equals operator, for instance:

interface Field<T> {
    Condition eq(Field<T> field);
    Condition eq(T value);
}

The above overloads allow you for writing things like the following, without needing to think about the distinction between a SQL expression and a Java bind variable (which is ultimately also a SQL expression):

// Comparing a column with bind variable
.where(BOOK.ID.eq(1))

// Comparing a column with another column expression
.and(BOOK.AUTHOR_ID.eq(AUTHOR.ID))

In fact, there are even more overloads, because the right hand side of a comparison operation can have other expressions as well, for instance:

interface Field<T> {
    Condition eq(Field<T> field);
    Condition eq(T value);
    Condition eq(Select<? extends Record1<T>> query);
    Condition eq(QuantifiedSelect<? extends Record1<T>> query);
}

Now, the same set of overloads needs to be repeated for not equals, greater than, greater or equal, etc. Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to express this “right-hand-side” thingy as a single, reusable type? I.e. a union type of all of the above types?

interface Field<T> {
    Condition eq(
        Field<T>
      | T
      | Select<? extends Record1<T>>
      | QuantifiedSelect<? extends Record1<T>> thingy
    );
}

Or even

// This is called a type alias. Another awesome
// Ceylon language feature (pseudo syntax)
alias Thingy => 
    Field<T>
  | T
  | Select<? extends Record1<T>>
  | QuantifiedSelect<? extends Record1<T>>;

interface Field<T> {
    Condition eq(Thingy thingy);
}

After all, that’s also how the SQL language is defined. Heck, that’s how any BNF notation defines syntactic elements. For instance:

<predicate> ::=
    <comparison predicate>
  | <between predicate>
  | <in predicate>
  | <like predicate>
  | <null predicate>
  | <quantified comparison predicate>
  | <exists predicate>
  | <unique predicate>
  | <match predicate>
  | <overlaps predicate>

OK, granted, a syntactic element is not strictly the same thing as a type, but the intuitive perception is the same.

Oh, and Java has union types, too!

In a brief flash of revelation, the Java 7 expert groups added support for union types in exception handling. You can write things like:

try {
    ...
}
catch (IOException | SQLException e) {
    // e can be any of the above!
}

And you can emulate union types with generics, which don’t support union types but intersection types in Java.

Back to Ceylon and NULL

Ceylon has gotten Null right. Because, historically, a nullable type is a type that can be the “real” type or the “null” value. We want that. We Java developers crave that. We cannot live without the soothing option of this kind of optional.

But the excellent thing about this approach is that it is extendable. What if I really need to distinguish between “unknown”, “uninitialised”, “undefined”, “42”? I can. Using types. Here’s a String that can model all of the aforementioned “special values”:

String|Unknown|Uninitialised|Undefined|FortyTwo

And if that’s too verbose, I just assign a name to it

interface TheStringToRuleThemAll
  => String|Unknown|Uninitialised|Undefined|FortyTwo;

But it cannot be Null. Because I don’t want it to be that value, that is everything and nothing. Are you convinced? I bet you are. From now on:

Don’t trust any language that pretends that the Option(al) monad is a decent approach at modelling null. It isn’t.

― me. Just now

Why? Let me illustrate. Kotlin/Ceylon/Groovy style syntax sugar using the elvis operator (regardless of the backing null semantics):

String name = bob?.department?.head?.name

Same thing with Optional monads:

Optional<String> name = bob
    .flatMap(Person::getDepartment)
    .map(Department::getHead)
    .flatMap(Person::getName);

AND POOR YOU IF YOU MIX UP map() WITH flatMap() JUST ONCE!!

Some people claim

Using union types is like driving around in a brand new Ferrari with your mother-in-law in the passenger seat.

by Elvira

Sure. But I claim: Well done, Ceylon. Let’s hope we’ll get union types in Java, too, outside of catch blocks!

Further reading

Liked this article? How about:

What the sun.misc.Unsafe Misery Teaches Us

Oracle will remove the internal sun.misc.Unsafe class in Java 9. While most people are probably rather indifferent regarding this change, some other people – mostly library developers – are not. There had been a couple of recent articles in the blogosphere painting a dark picture of what this change will imply:

Maintaining a public API is extremely difficult, especially when the API is as popular as that of the JDK. There is simply (almost) no way to keep people from shooting themselves in the foot. Oracle (and previously Sun) have always declared the sun.* packages as internal and not to be used. Citing from the page called “Why Developers Should Not Write Programs That Call ‘sun’ Packages”:

The sun.* packages are not part of the supported, public interface.

A Java program that directly calls into sun.* packages is not guaranteed to work on all Java-compatible platforms. In fact, such a program is not guaranteed to work even in future versions on the same platform.

This disclaimer is just one out of many similar disclaimers and warnings. Whoever goes ahead and uses Unsafe does so … “unsafely“.

What do we learn from this?

The concrete solution to solving this misery is being discussed and still open. A good idea would be to provide a formal and public replacement before removing Unsafe, in order to allow for migration paths of the offending libraries.

But there’s a more important message to all of this. The message is:

When all you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a thumb

Translated to this situation: The hammer is Unsafe and given that it’s a very poor hammer, but the only option, well, library developers might just not have had much of a choice. They’re not really to blame. In fact, they took a gamble in one of the world’s most stable and backwards compatible software environments (= Java) and they fared extremely well for more than 10 years. Would you have made a different choice in a similar situation? Or, let me ask differently. Was betting on AWT or Swing a much safer choice at the time?

If something can somehow be used by someone, then it will be, no matter how obviously they’re gonna shoot themselves in the foot. The only way to currently write a library / API and really prevent users from accessing internals is to put everything in a single package and make everything package-private. This is what we’ve been doing in jOOQ from the beginning, knowing that jOOQ’s internals are extremely delicate and subject to change all the time.

For more details about this rationale, read also:

However, this solution has a severe drawback for those developing those internals. It’s a hell of a package with almost no structure. That makes development rather difficult.

What would be a better Java, then?

Java has always had an insufficient set of visibilities:

  • public
  • protected
  • default (package-private)
  • private

There should be a fifth visibility that behaves like public but prevents access from “outside” of a module. In a way, that’s between the existing public and default visibilities. Let’s call this the hypothetical module visibility.

In fact, not only should we be able to declare this visibility on a class or member, we should be able to govern module inter-dependencies on a top level, just like the Ceylon language allows us to do:

module org.hibernate "3.0.0.beta" {
    import ceylon.collection "1.0.0";
    import java.base "7";
    shared import java.jdbc "7";
}

This reads very similar to OSGi’s bundle system, where bundles can be imported / exported, although the above module syntax is much much simpler than configuring OSGi.

A sophisticated module system would go even further. Not only would it match OSGi’s features, it would also match those of Maven. With the possibility of declaring dependencies on a Java language module basis, we might no longer need the XML-based Maven descriptors, as those could be generated from a simple module syntax (or Gradle, or ant/ivy).

And with all of this in place, classes like sun.misc.Unsafe could be declared as module-visible for only a few JDK modules – not the whole world. I’m sure the number of people abusing reflection to get a hold of those internals would decrease by 50%.

Conclusion

I do hope that in a future Java, this Ceylon language feature (and also Fantom language feature, btw) will be incorporated into the Java language. A nice overview of Java 9 / Jigsaw’s modular encapsulation can be seen in this blog post:

The Features Project Jigsaw Brings To Java 9

Until then, if you’re an API designer, do know that all disclaimers won’t work. Your internal APIs will be used and abused by your clients. They’re part of your ordinary public API from day 1 after you publish them. It’s not your user’s fault. That’s how things work.

10 Java Articles Everyone Must Read

One month ago, we’ve published a list of 10 SQL Articles Everyone Must Read. A list of articles that we believe would add exceptional value to our readers on the jOOQ blog. The jOOQ blog is a blog focusing on both Java and SQL, so it is only natural that today, one month later, we’re publishing an equally exciting list of 10 Java articles everyone must read.

Note that by “must read”, we may not specifically mean the particular linked article only, but also other works from the same authors, who have been regular bloggers over the past years and never failed to produce new interesting content!

Here goes…

1. Brian Goetz: “Stewardship: the Sobering Parts”

The first blog post is actually not a blog post but a recording of a very interesting talk by Brian Goetz on Oracle’s stewardship of Java. On the jOOQ blog, we’ve been slightly critical about 1-2 features of the Java language in the past, e.g. when comparing it to Scala, or Ceylon.

Brian makes good points about why it would not be a good idea for Java to become just as “modern” as quickly as other languages. A must-watch for every Java developer (around 1h)

2. Aleksey Shipilёv: The Black Magic of (Java) Method Dispatch

In recent years, the JVM has seen quite a few improvements, including invokedynamic that arrived in Java 7 as a prerequisite for Java 8 lambdas, as well as a great tool for other, more dynamic languages built on top of the JVM, such as Nashorn.

invokedynamic is only a small, “high level” puzzle piece in the advanced trickery performed by the JVM. What really happens under the hood when you call methods? How are they resolved, optimised by the JIT? Aleksey’s article sub-title reveals what the article is really about:

“Everything you wanted to know about Black Deviously Surreptitious Magic in low-level performance engineering”

Definitely not a simple read, but a great post to learn about the power of the JVM.

Read Aleksey’s “The Black Magic of (Java) Method Dispatch

3. Oliver White: Java Tools and Technologies Landscape for 2014

We’re already in 2015, but this report by Oliver White (at the time head of ZeroTurnaround’s RebelLabs) had been exceptionally well executed and touches pretty much everything related to the Java ecosystem.

Read Oliver’s “Java Tools and Technologies Landscape for 2014

4. Peter Lawrey: Java Lambdas and Low Latency

When Aleksey has introduced us to some performance semantics in the JVM, Peter takes this one step further, talking about low latency in Java 8. We could have picked many other useful little blog posts from Peter’s blog, which is all about low-latency, high performance computing on the JVM, sometimes even doing advanced off-heap trickery.

Read Peter’s “Java Lambdas and Low Latency

5. Nicolai Parlog: Everything You Need To Know About Default Methods

Nicolai is a newcomer in the Java blogosphere, and a very promising one, too. His well-researched articles go in-depth about some interesting facts related to Java 8, digging out old e-mails from the expert group’s mailing list, explaining the decisions they made to conclude with what we call Java 8 today.

Read Nicolai’s “Everything You Need To Know About Default Methods

6. Lukas Eder: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Java

This list wouldn’t be complete without listing another list that we wrote ourselves on the jOOQ blog. Java is an old beast with 20 years of history this year in 2015. This old beast has a lot of secrets and caveats that many people have forgotten or never thought about. We’ve uncovered them for you:

Read Lukas’s “10 Things You Didn’t Know About Java

7. Edwin Dalorzo: Why There Is Interface Pollution in Java 8

Edwin has been responding to our own blog posts a couple of times in the past with very well researched and thoroughly thought through articles, in particular about Java 8 related features, e.g. comparing Java 8 Streams with LINQ (something that we’ve done ourselves, as well).

This particular article explains why there are so many different and differently named functional interfaces in Java 8.

Read Edwin’s “Why There Is Interface Pollution in Java 8

8. Vlad Mihalcea: How Does PESSIMISTIC_FORCE_INCREMENT Lock Mode Work

When Java talks to databases, many people default to using Hibernate for convenience (see also 3. Oliver White: Java Tools and Technologies Landscape for 2014). Hibernate’s main vision, however, is not to add convenience – you can get that in many other ways as well. Hibernate’s main vision is to provide powerful means of navigating and persisting an object graph representation of your RDBMS’s data model, including various ways of locking.

Vlad is an extremely proficient Hibernate user, who has a whole blog series on how Hibernate works going. We’ve picked a recent, well-researched article about locking, but we strongly suggest you read the other articles as well:

Read Vlad’s “How Does PESSIMISTIC_FORCE_INCREMENT Lock Mode Work

9. Petri Kainulainen: Writing Clean Tests

This isn’t a purely Java-related blog post, although it is written from the perspective of a Java developer. Modern development involves testing – automatic testing – and lots of it. Petri has written an interesting blog series about writing clean tests in Java – you shouldn’t miss his articles!

Read Petri’s “Writing Clean Tests

10. Eugen Paraschiv: Java 8 Resources Collection

If you don’t already have at least 9 open tabs with interesting stuff to read after this list, get ready for a browser tab explosion! Eugen Paraschiv who maintains baeldung.com has been collecting all sorts of very interesting resources related to Java 8 in a single link collection. You should definitely bookmark this collection and check back frequently for interesting changes:

Read Eugen’s “Java 8 Resources Collection

Many other articles

There are, of course, many other very good articles providing deep insight into useful Java tricks. If you find you’ve encountered an article that would nicely complement this list, please leave a link and description in the comments section. Future readers will appreciate the additional insight.

The Inconvenient Truth About Dynamic vs. Static Typing

Sometimes there are these moments of truth. They happen completely unexpectedly, such as when I read this tweet:

David is the author of the lesser-known but not at all lesser-interesting Whiley programming language, a language that has a lot of static type checking built in it. One of the most interesting features of the Whiley language is flow sensitive typing (sometimes also simply called flow typing), which is mostly useful when used along with union types. An example from the getting started guide

function indexOf(string str, char c) => null|int:

function split(string str, char c) => [string]:
  var idx = indexOf(str,c)

  // idx has type null|int
  if idx is int:

    // idx now has type int
    string below = str[0..idx]
    string above = str[idx..]
    return [below,above]

  else:
    // idx now has type null
    return [str] // no occurrence

Remember, other languages like Ceylon also know flow-sensitive typing, and even Java does to a certain extent, because Java has union types, too!

try {
    ...
}
catch (SQLException | IOException e) {
    if (e instanceof SQLException)
        doSomething((SQLException) e);
    else
        doSomethingElse((IOException) e);
}

Granted, Java’s flow-sensitive typing is explicit and verbose. We could expect the Java compiler to infer all the types. The following should type-check and compile just as well:

try {
    ...
}
catch (SQLException | IOException e) {
    if (e instanceof SQLException)
        // e is guaranteed to be of type SQLException
        doSomething(e);
    else
        // e is guaranteed to be of type IOException
        doSomethingElse(e);
}

Flow typing or flow sensitive typing means that the compiler can infer the only possible type from the control flow of the surrounding program. It is a relatively new concept in modern languages like Ceylon, and it makes static typing extremely powerful, especially if the language also supports sophisticated type inference via var or val keywords!

JavaScript static typing with Flow

Let’s get back to David’s Tweet and have a look at what the article said about Flow:

http://sitr.us/2014/11/21/flow-is-the-javascript-type-checker-i-have-been-waiting-for.html

The presence of a use of length with a null argument informs Flow that there should be a null check in that function. This version does type-check:

function length(x) {
  if (x) {
    return x.length;
  } else {
    return 0;
  }
}

var total = length('Hello') + length(null);

Flow is able to infer that x cannot be null inside the if body.

That’s quite cunning. A similar upcoming feature can be observed in Microsoft’s TypeScript. But Flow is different (or claims to be different) from TypeScript. The essence of Facebook Flow can be seen in this paragraph from the official Flow announcement:

Flow’s type checking is opt-in — you do not need to type check all your code at once. However, underlying the design of Flow is the assumption that most JavaScript code is implicitly statically typed; even though types may not appear anywhere in the code, they are in the developer’s mind as a way to reason about the correctness of the code. Flow infers those types automatically wherever possible, which means that it can find type errors without needing any changes to the code at all. On the other hand, some JavaScript code, especially frameworks, make heavy use of reflection that is often hard to reason about statically. For such inherently dynamic code, type checking would be too imprecise, so Flow provides a simple way to explicitly trust such code and move on. This design is validated by our huge JavaScript codebase at Facebook: Most of our code falls in the implicitly statically typed category, where developers can check their code for type errors without having to explicitly annotate that code with types.

Let this sink in

most JavaScript code is implicitly statically typed

again

JavaScript code is implicitly statically typed

Yes!

Programmers love type systems. Programmers love to reason formally about their data types and put them in narrow constraints to be sure the program is correct. That’s the whole essence of static typing: To make less mistakes because of well-designed data structures.

People also love to put their data structures in well-designed forms in databases, which is why SQL is so popular and “schema-less” databases will not gain more market share. Because in fact, it’s the same story. You still have a schema in a “schema-less” database, it’s just not type checked and thus leaves you all the burden of guaranteeing correctness.

On a side note: Obviously, some NoSQL vendors keep writing these ridiculous blog posts to desperately position their products, claiming that you really don’t need any schema at all, but it’s easy to see through that marketing gag. True need for schemalessness is as rare as true need for dynamic typing. In other words, when is the last time you’ve written a Java program and called every method via reflection? Exactly…

But there’s one thing that statically typed languages didn’t have in the past and that dynamically typed languages did have: Means to circumvent verbosity. Because while programmers love type systems and type checking, programmers do not love typing (as in typing on the keyboard).

Verbosity is the killer. Not static typing

Consider the evolution of Java:

Java 4

List list = new ArrayList();
list.add("abc");
list.add("xyz");

// Eek. Why do I even need this Iterator?
Iterator iterator = list.iterator();
while (iterator.hasNext()) {
    // Gee, I *know* I only have strings. Why cast?
    String value = (String) iterator.next();

    // [...]
}

Java 5

// Agh, I have to declare the generic type twice!
List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
list.add("abc");
list.add("xyz");

// Much better, but I have to write String again?
for (String value : list) {
    // [...]
}

Java 7

// Better, but I still need to write down two
// times the "same" List type
List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();
list.add("abc");
list.add("xyz");

for (String value : list) {
    // [...]
}

Java 8

// We're now getting there, slowly
Stream.of("abc", "xyz").forEach(value -> {
    // [...]
});

On a side-note, yes, you could’ve used Arrays.asList() all along.

Java 8 is still far from perfect, but things are getting better and better. The fact that I finally do not have to declare a type anymore in a lambda argument list because it can be inferred by the compiler is something really important for productivity and adoption.

Consider the equivalent of a lambda pre-Java 8 (if we had Streams before):

// Yes, it's a Consumer, fine. And yes it takes Strings
Stream.of("abc", "xyz").forEach(new Consumer<String>(){
    // And yes, the method is called accept (who cares)
    // And yes, it takes Strings (I already say so!?)
    @Override
    public void accept(String value) {
        // [...]
    }
});

Now, if we’re comparing the Java 8 version with a JavaScript version:

["abc", "xyz"].forEach(function(value) {
    // [...]
});

We have almost reached as little verbosity as the functional, dynamically typed language that is JavaScript (I really wouldn’t mind those missing list and map literals in Java), with the only difference that we (and the compiler) know that value is of type String. And we know that the forEach() method exists. And we know that forEach() takes a function with one argument.

In the end of the day, things seem to boil down to this:

Dynamically typed languages like JavaScript and PHP have become popular mainly because they “just ran”. You didn’t have to learn all the “heavy” syntax that classic statically typed languages required (just think of Ada and PL/SQL!). You could just start writing your program. Programmers “knew” that the variables would contain strings, there’s no need to write it down. And that’s true, there’s no need to write everything down!

Consider Scala (or C#, Ceylon, pretty much any modern language):

val value = "abc"

What else can it be, other than a String?

val list = List("abc", "xyz")

What else can it be, other than a List[String]?

Note that you can still explicitly type your variables if you must – there are always those edge cases:

val list : List[String] = List[String]("abc", "xyz")

But most of the syntax is “opt-in” and can be inferred by the compiler.

Dynamically typed languages are dead

The conclusion of all this is that once syntactic verbosity and friction is removed from statically typed languages, there is absolutely no advantage in using a dynamically typed language. Compilers are very fast, deployment can be fast too, if you use the right tools, and the benefit of static type checking is huge. (don’t believe it? read this article)

As an example, SQL is also a statically typed language where much of the friction is still created by syntax. Yet, many people believe that it is a dynamically typed language, because they access SQL through JDBC, i.e. through type-less concatenated Strings of SQL statements. If you were writing PL/SQL, Transact-SQL, or embedded SQL in Java with jOOQ, you wouldn’t think of SQL this way and you’d immediately appreciate the fact that your PL/SQL, Transact-SQL, or your Java compiler would type-check all of your SQL statements.

So, let’s abandon this mess that we’ve created because we’re too lazy to type all the types (pun). Happy typing!

And if you’re reading this, Java language expert group members, please do add var and val, as well as flow-sensitive typing to the Java language. We’ll love you forever for this, promised!

Java 8 Friday: Optional Will Remain an Option in Java

At Data Geekery, we love Java. And as we’re really into jOOQ’s fluent API and query DSL, we’re absolutely thrilled about what Java 8 will bring to our ecosystem.

Java 8 Friday

Every Friday, we’re showing you a couple of nice new tutorial-style Java 8 features, which take advantage of lambda expressions, extension methods, and other great stuff. You’ll find the source code on GitHub.

Optional: A new Option in Java

So far, we’ve been pretty thrilled with all the additions to Java 8. All in all, this is a revolution more than anything before. But there are also one or two sore spots. One of them is how Java will never really get rid of

Null: The billion dollar mistake tweet this

In a previous blog post, we have explained the merits of NULL handling in the Ceylon language, which has found one of the best solutions to tackle this issue – at least on the JVM which is doomed to support the null pointer forever. In Ceylon, nullability is a flag that can be added to every type by appending a question mark to the type name. An example:

void hello() {
    String? name = process.arguments.first;
    String greeting;
    if (exists name) {
        greeting = "Hello, ``name``!";
    }
    else {
        greeting = "Hello, World!";
    }
    print(greeting);
}

That’s pretty slick. Combined with flow-sensitive typing, you will never run into the dreaded NullPointerException again:

Recently in the Operating Room. By Geek and Poke

Recently in the Operating Room. By Geek and Poke

Other languages have introduced the Option type. Most prominently: Scala. Java 8 now also introduced the Optional type (as well as the OptionalInt, OptionalLong, OptionalDouble types – more about those later on)

How does Optional work?

The main point behind Optional is to wrap an Object and to provide convenience API to handle nullability in a fluent manner. This goes well with Java 8 lambda expressions, which allow for lazy execution of operations. An example:

Optional<String> stringOrNot = Optional.of("123");

// This String reference will never be null
String alwaysAString =
    stringOrNot.orElse("");

// This Integer reference will be wrapped again
Optional<Integer> integerOrNot = 
    stringOrNot.map(Integer::parseInt);

// This int reference will never be null
int alwaysAnInt = stringOrNot
        .map(s -> Integer.parseInt(s))
        .orElse(0);

There are certain merits to the above in fluent APIs, specifically in the new Java 8 Streams API, which makes extensive use of Optional. For example:

Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3)
      .stream()
      .findAny()
      .ifPresent(System.out::println);

The above piece of code will print any number from the Stream onto the console, but only if such a number exists.

Old API is not retrofitted

For obvious backwards-compatibility reasons, the “old API” is not retrofitted. In other words, unlike Scala, Java 8 doesn’t use Optional all over the JDK. In fact, the only place where Optional is used is in the Streams API. As you can see in the Javadoc, usage is very scarce:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/class-use/Optional.html

This makes Optional a bit difficult to use. We’ve already blogged about this topic before. Concretely, the absence of an Optional type in the API is no guarantee of non-nullability. This is particularly nasty if you convert Streams into collections and collections into streams.

The Java 8 Optional type is treacherous tweet this

Parametric polymorphism

The worst implication of Optional on its “infected” API is parametric polymorphism, or simply: generics. When you reason about types, you will quickly understand that:

// This is a reference to a simple type:
Number s;

// This is a reference to a collection of
// the above simple type:
Collection<Number> c;

Generics are often used for what is generally accepted as composition. We have a Collection of String. With Optional, this compositional semantics is slightly abused (both in Scala and Java) to “wrap” a potentially nullable value. We now have:

// This is a reference to a nullable simple type:
Optional<Number> s;

// This is a reference to a collection of 
// possibly nullable simple types
Collection<Optional<Number>> c;

So far so good. We can substitute types to get the following:

// This is a reference to a simple type:
T s;

// This is a reference to a collection of
// the above simple type:
Collection<T> c;

But now enter wildcards and use-site variance. We can write

// No variance can be applied to simple types:
T s;

// Variance can be applied to collections of
// simple types:
Collection<? extends T> source;
Collection<? super T> target;

What do the above types mean in the context of Optional? Intuitively, we would like this to be about things like Optional<? extends Number> or Optional<? super Number>. In the above example we can write:

// Read a T-value from the source
T s = source.iterator().next();

// ... and put it into the target
target.add(s);

But this doesn’t work any longer with Optional

Collection<Optional<? extends T>> source;
Collection<Optional<? super T>> target;

// Read a value from the source
Optional<? extends T> s = source.iterator().next();

// ... cannot put it into the target
target.add(s); // Nope

… and there is no other way to reason about use-site variance when we have Optional and subtly more complex API.

If you add generic type erasure to the discussion, things get even worse. We no longer erase the component type of the above Collection, we also erase the type of virtually any reference. From a runtime / reflection perspective, this is almost like using Object all over the place!

Generic type systems are incredibly complex even for simple use-cases. Optional makes things only worse. It is quite hard to blend Optional with traditional collections API or other APIs. Compared to the ease of use of Ceylon’s flow-sensitive typing, or even Groovy’s elvis operator, Optional is like a sledge-hammer in your face.

Be careful when you apply it to your API!

Primitive types

One of the main reasons why Optional is still a very useful addition is the fact that the “object-stream” and the “primitive streams” have a “unified API” by the fact that we also have OptionalInt, OptionalLong, OptionalDouble types.

In other words, if you’re operating on primitive types, you can just switch the stream construction and reuse the rest of your stream API usage source code, in almost the same way. Compare these two chains:

// Stream and Optional
Optional<Integer> anyInteger = 
Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3)
      .stream()
      .filter(i -> i % 2 == 0)
      .findAny();
anyInteger.ifPresent(System.out::println);

// IntStream and OptionalInt
OptionalInt anyInt =
Arrays.stream(new int[] {1, 2, 3})
      .filter(i -> i % 2 == 0)
      .findAny();
anyInt.ifPresent(System.out::println);

In other words, given the scarce usage of these new types in JDK API, the dubious usefulness of such a type in general (if retrofitted into a very backwards-compatible environment) and the implications generics erasure have on Optional we dare say that

The only reason why this type was really added is to provide a more unified Streams API for both reference and primitive types tweet this

That’s tough. And makes us wonder, if we should finally get rid of primitive types altogether.

Oh, and…

Optional isn’t Serializable.

Nope. Not Serializable. Unlike ArrayList, for instance. For the usual reason:

Making something in the JDK serializable makes a dramatic increase in our maintenance costs, because it means that the representation is frozen for all time. This constrains our ability to evolve implementations in the future, and the number of cases where we are unable to easily fix a bug or provide an enhancement, which would otherwise be simple, is enormous. So, while it may look like a simple matter of “implements Serializable” to you, it is more than that. The amount of effort consumed by working around an earlier choice to make something serializable is staggering.

Citing Brian Goetz, from:

http://mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/jdk8-dev/2013-September/003276.html

Want to discuss Optional? Read these threads on reddit:

Stay tuned for more exciting Java 8 stuff published in this blog series.

More on Java 8

In the mean time, have a look at Eugen Paraschiv’s awesome Java 8 resources page

Top 10 Ceylon Language Features I Wish We Had In Java

What does one do when Hibernate is “finished” and feature complete and one needs new challenges? Right. One creates a new JVM language called Ceylon.

On November 12, 2013, Ceylon 1.0.0 was finally released and we congratulate the whole team at Red Hat for their achievements in what looks like a very promising new JVM language. While it will be a slight challenge for Ceylon to compete with Scala, there are lots of very interesting features that distinguish it.

In fact, this language has so many interesting features, it’ll be hard to write up a blog post about the 10 most interesting ones. Which ones to choose? On Google Plus, I’ve had a short chat with Gavin King who also brought us Hibernate, Ross Tate who is also involved with JetBrains’ Kotlin, and Lukas Rytz who was a PhD student and committer for EPFL’s Scala and now works at Google Dart. I wanted those language Uberdesigners to help me find the 10 most thrilling language features that they have and we Java developers don’t. Now I have 20 interesting ones. I’ll certainly write a follow-up post to this one.

I have observed Gavin King and the other guys to be very enthusiastic and knowledgeable. I’ve already had this impression before when I first heard about Ceylon from Stéphane Épardaud at the JUGS in Berne, Switzerland in February 2013, another one of RedHat’s passionate engineers (see his presentation’s slides here).

Anyway, enough of the who’s who. Here’s our personal Top 10 List of Ceylon Language Features I Wish We Had In Java:

1. Modules

In Java, Jigsaw has been postponed about 34 times and we’re only now closing in on Java 8 GA! Yes, we have OSGi and Maven, and both work very well to manage dependencies at runtime (OSGi) or at compile-time (Maven). But compare this black magic Maven/OSGi configuration using Apache Felix

<plugin>
  <groupId>org.apache.felix</groupId>
  <artifactId>maven-bundle-plugin</artifactId>
  <version>2.1.0</version>
  <extensions>true</extensions>
  <executions>
    <execution>
      <id>bundle-manifest</id>
      <phase>process-classes</phase>
      <goals>
        <goal>manifest</goal>
      </goals>
    </execution>
  </executions>
  <configuration>
    <supportedProjectTypes>
      <supportedProjectType>
        jar
      </supportedProjectType>
    </supportedProjectTypes>
    <instructions>
      <Bundle-SymbolicName>
        org.jooq
      </Bundle-SymbolicName>
      <Export-Package>*</Export-Package>
      <Import-Package>
        javax.persistence;resolution:=optional,
        org.apache.log4j;resolution:=optional,
        *
      </Import-Package>
      <_versionpolicy>
        [$(version;==;$(@)),$(version;+;$(@)))
      </_versionpolicy>
    </instructions>
  </configuration>
</plugin>

… with this one by Ceylon:

"The second best ever ORM solution!"
license "http://www.gnu.org/licenses/lgpl.html"
module org.hibernate "3.0.0.beta" {
    import ceylon.collection "1.0.0";
    import java.base "7";
    shared import java.jdbc "7";
}

Finally, things can be controlled on a jar-level, including visibility of packages. With only few lines of code. Please, Java, integrate Ceylon’s powerful module support.

It may be worth mentioning that Fantom is another language with integrated module support. See JodaTime’s Stephen Colebourne’s talk at Devoxx 2011: “Is Fantom Light Years Ahead of Scala?”. Stephen has also brought us ElSql, a new external SQL DSL for Java templating.

2. Sequences

This is the first time I’ve seen this kind of first class support for sequences in a typesafe language. Not only does Ceylon ship with all sorts of collection literals, it also knows types for these constructs. Concretely, you can declare an Iterable as such:

{String+} words = { "hello", "world" };

Notice the notation of the literal. It is of type {String+}, meaning that it contains at least one element. The type is assignment-compatible with {String*}, which represents a possibly empty sequence. Very interesting.

This goes on by supporting array literals as such:

String[] operators = [ "+", "-", "*", "/" ];
String? plus = operators[0];
String[] multiplicative = operators[2..3];

… or tuple literals:

[Float,Float,String] point = [0.0, 0.0, "origin"];

Notice also the range literal 2..3 which allows for extracting sub-arrays from the original array. So much sequence goodness in Ceylon!

Notice also the question mark in String?, which is Ceylon’s way of declaring …

3. Nullable types

While Scala knows the Option type and Haskell knows the Maybe type and Java 8 tries to compete by adding the new, unenforceable Optional type, Ceylon has a very simple notion of something that is nullable. If there’s a question mark behind a type, it’s nullable. Otherwise, it’s not null. Always.

In order to convert a nullable type into a not nullable type, you have to explicitly check:

void hello() {
    String? name = process.arguments.first;
    String greeting;
    if (exists name) {
        greeting = "Hello, ``name``!";
    }
    else {
        greeting = "Hello, World!";
    }
    print(greeting);
}

Notice the exists operator. It defines a new scope within which the name variable is known to be not null, i.e. it is promoted from String? to String. This locally scoped type promotion is commonly referred to as flow-sensitive typing, which has already been observed in the Whiley language, according to Lukas Rytz.

If you omit the exists check, you’d get a compilation error on that string interpolation there. There are also other useful constructs to perform ad-hoc type conversions:

String greeting = "Hello, " + (name else "World");

The else clause acts like a SQL COALESCE() function and can even be chained. Read more about Ceylon’s nullable goodness.

4. Defaulted parameters

OMG, how I wish we had that in Java. Every time we overload methods, we think, why not just support defaulted parameters like PL/SQL, for instance??

void hello(String name="World") {
    print("Hello, ``name``!");
}

I cannot think of a single good reason why languages wouldn’t have named and defaultable parameters like PL/SQL:

-- One of the parameters is optional
CREATE PROCEDURE MY_PROCEDURE (
  P1 IN NUMBER,
  P2 IN VARCHAR2 := 'ABC',
  P3 IN VARCHAR2
);

-- Calling the procedure
MY_PROCEDURE(
  P1 => 1,
  P3 => 'XYZ'
);

So this is one way to circumvent method overloading in most common cases. Method overloading is still tedious when we want to deal with alternative, incompatible types. But not in Ceylon, as Ceylon knows …

5. Union types

OK, this is a bit esoteric. The creators of Ceylon really really wanted to get rid of method overloading, partially because Ceylon also compiles to JavaScript, and JavaScript does not know function overloading. In fact, it is not possible to overload methods in Ceylon at all. To be able to interoperate with Java, however, union types needed to be introduced. A union type String|Integer can be either a String or an Integer. There’s method overloading right there!

void printType(String|Integer|Float val) { ... }
 
printType("hello");
printType(69);
printType(-1.0);

In order to “untangle” the union type, you can again take advantage of flow-sensitive typing for the val parameter by performing type-checks similar to Java’s instanceof

void printType(String|Integer|Float val) {
    switch (val)
    case (is String) { print("String: ``val``"); }
    case (is Integer) { print("Integer: ``val``"); }
    case (is Float) { print("Float: ``val``"); }
}

Within that scope, val is known to the compiler to be of type String, for example. This goes on to allowing crazy stuff like enumerated types where a type can be one or another thing, simultaneously:

abstract class Point()
        of Polar | Cartesian {
    // ...
}

Note that this is very different from multiple inheritance where such a Point would be both Polar and Cartesian. But that’s not all. Ceylon also has …

6. Intersection types

Now, as you may have guessed, that’s the exact inverse of a union type, and this is actually also supported by Java’s generics. In Java, you can write:

class X<E extends Serializable & Comparable<E>> {}

In the above example, X accepts only type parameters that are both Serializable and Comparable. This is much crazier in Ceylon where you can assign values to a locally declared intersection type. And that’s not it! In our chat, Gavin has pointed out this incredible language feature to me, where union / intersection types can interact with flow-sensitive typing to form the following (due for Ceylon 1.2):

value x = X();
//x has type X
if (something) {
    x = Y();
    //x has type Y
}
//x has type X|Y

Makes sense, right? So I asked him, if I will be able to intersect that type again with Z and Gavin said, yes! The following can be done:

value x = X();
//x has type X
if (something) {
    x = Y();
    //x has type Y
}
//x has type X|Y
if (is Z x) {
    //x has type <X|Y>&Z
}

And this goes on, because type intersections also interact with generics in a very interesting way. Under certain circumstances, X<A>&X<B> can be the same as X<A&B>. In other words, intersections (and unions) are distributive with generics, just like additions are with multiplications (in an informal understanding of “just like”). If you’re willing to delve into the language spec for this, see §3.7.2 Principal instantiation inheritance.

Now, union and intersection types can get quite nasty und hard to reuse. This is why Ceylon has …

7. Type aliases

Is there any other programming language that ever thought of this awesome feature?? This is so useful, even if you’re not supporting union and/or intersection types. Think about Java’s generics. With the advent of generics, people started writing stuff like:

Map<String, List<Map<Integer, String>>> map = // ...

Two things can be said:

  • Generics are extremely useful to the Java libraries
  • Generics become extremely verbose when doing the above

Here’s where type aliases come into play. Check out this example:

interface People => Set<Person>;

The point here is that even if some verbose types are reused very often, you don’t often want to create an explicit subtype for the above. In other words, you don’t want to abuse subtype polymorphism as a shortcut to “simplify” generic polymorphism.

Think of aliases as an expandable macro, which is mutually assignment-compatible. In other words, you can write:

People?      p1 = null;
Set<Person>? p2 = p1;
People?      p3 = p2;

So as the term “alias” suggests, you’re not creating a new type. You’re just giving a complex type a simpler name. But even better than type aliasing is …

8. Type inference

Many other languages have this and so does Java to a certain extent, at least as far as generics are involved. Java 8 goes one step further in allowing type inference with generics. But Java is far away from what languages like Scala or Ceylon can do with local variables:

interface Foo {}
interface Bar {}
object foobar satisfies Foo&Bar {}
//inferred type Basic&Foo&Bar
value fb = foobar; 
//inferred type {Basic&Foo&Bar+}
value fbs = { foobar, foobar };

So, this example shows a lot of features combined, including type constraints, sequence types, union types. With such a rich type system it is very important to support this level of type inference where a value keyword indicates that you don’t want to (or you cannot) explicitly declare a type. This, I’d really love to see in Java 9!

Read more about Ceylon’s awesome type inference capabilities.

9. Declaration-site variance

Now, this feature might be a bit harder to understand, as Java’s generics are already quite difficult to understand. I’ve recently read a very interesting paper by Ross Tate, Alan Leung and Sorin Lerner about the challenges brought to Java generics through wildcards: Taming Wildcards in Java’s Type System. Generics are still a very active research topic neither researchers nor language designers completely agree on whether use-site variance (as in Java) or declaration-site variance (as in C#, Scala, or Ceylon) is really better for mainstream programmers. Older languages talking about variance are Eiffel and OCaml.

Microsoft has introduced declaration-site variance in C#. I’ll cite the example from Wikipedia, which is very easy to understand. In C#, the IEnumerator interface has a covariant generic type parameter:

interface IEnumerator<out T>
{
    T Current { get; }
    bool MoveNext();
}

This simply means that the following will work:

IEnumerator<Cat> cats = ...
IEnumerator<Animal> animals = cats;

This is quite different from Java’s use-site variance, where the above wouldn’t compile, but the following would:

Iterator<Cat> cats = ...
Iterator<? extends Animal> animals = cats;

The main reason for declaration-site covariance is the simple fact that verbosity is greatly reduced at the use-site. Wildcards are a major pain to Java developers and they lead to numerous Stack Overflow questions as this one, which is about locally scoped wild-cards:

// Given this interface:
public interface X<E> {
    E get();
    E set(E e);
}

// This does not compile:
public void foo(X<?> x) {
    x.set(x.get());
}

As can be seen in the Ceylon language tour, Ceylon generics support declaration-site variance, just like C# and Scala. It will be interesting to see how these things evolve, as both types of variance support have their pros and cons, while at the same time, Ross Tate advocates mixed-site variance, which would really be a great addition for the Java language!

Now this was a bit complex, so let’s have a look at a simpler, yet awesome feature to round things up …

10. Functions and methods

One of the main things outlined by Stéphane Épardaud was the fact that the Ceylon language is a very regular language. This is particularly apparent when considering how Ceylon treats functions (and methods, which are type member functions). I can put a function everywhere. Consider this example:

Integer f1() => 1;
class C() {
    shared Integer f2() {
        Integer f3() => 2;
        return f3();
    }
}

print(f1());
print(C().f2());

In the above example,

  • f1() is a package-level function (much like a “global” static function in Java)
  • f2() is a regular method on the C class
  • f3() is a local function within the f2() method

With Java 8’s support for lambda expressions, these things get a bit better, but isn’t it awesome to be able to declare functions anywhere, in almost the same syntax?

Conclusion: Play around with Ceylon

That’s it for now. We might be publishing a follow-up article about the more esoteric language features in Ceylon, some time soon. In any case, you can download this interesting JVM language for free with first-class IDE support in Eclipse. You can also visit the Ceylon documentation website and have their website compile Ceylon code into JavaScript for execution in your browser.

Visit the Community and interact with the language designers from RedHat and Serli, and when you’re done, share this post on our jOOQ blog and help the JCP recognise that this wonderful language has a couple of very interesting features to put on the Java 9 or 10 roadmap!