3 Reasons why It’s Okay to Stick with SQL

The past decade has been an extremely exciting one in all matters related to data. We have had:

  • An ever increasing amount of data produced by social media (once called “Web 2.0”)
  • An ever increasing amount of data produced by devices (a.k.a. the Internet of Things)
  • An ever increasing amount of database vendors that explore “new” models

Marketers, publishers, and evangelists coined the term “Big Data” and “NoSQL” to wrap up the fuzzy ideas around persistence technology that have emerged in the last decade. But how big is “Big Data”? Do you do “Big Data”? Do you need to do “Big Data”? The truth is… you don’t. You can keep using the same architecture and relational databases you’ve always had, for these three reasons.

1. RAM prices are crumbling
2. SQL is the best language for querying
3. Procedural languages are ideal for computing

RDBMS have won in the past & will win again.

3 Reasons why It’s Okay to Stick with SQL is an article that we’ve published in collaboration with our content marketing partners at DZone. Unfortunately, the below DZone guide is no longer available from DZone:

dzone-persistence

Tech Pro: Next Generation Social Content Syndication

Some established content syndicators and discussion platforms include DZone and JCG, my two blog syndication partners. For a content producer like me, such platforms are very interesting, as 10% of their traffic eventually reaches my blog. But there’s room for improvement with these syndicators, as their appearance is not up to date with the latest HTML5 / Frontend developments. DZone uses what appears to be a home-grown editing tool chain, whereas JCG is simply a very large wordpress blog.

Other platforms that are highly relevant but not really up to date with the latest frontend developments include Oracle’s OTN, O’Reilly’s On Java, and The Server Side

TECH.PRO
TECH.PRO. The Tech.Pro logo is a trademark of SIOPCO

Here’s a new-comer, which you should definitely keep an eye on: Tech.Pro, combining a very lean, responsive, intuitive and modern web UI with high-quality articles and social networking. The platform feels fully integrated, something that one wants to participate in.

Not only their website, but also their newsletter is nicely done, with cute images accompanying every post.

Tech.Pro is certainly something to keep an eye on in the near future!

nerd-table-cool-table

Static, Non-Static. Mockable, Non-Mockable… Instead, Let’s Focus on Real Added Value…

The never ending topic of testability… Dogmatic discussions about stuff being static, non-static. Mockable, non-mockable. Testable, non-testable. Here’s an article that was recently syndicated on DZone, about the evilness in making things static:

http://java.dzone.com/articles/why-static-bad-and-how-avoid

While the article itself is still somewhat focused on simple means of making something mockable through dependency injection, the big lot of comments and rants is just amazing. If you closely look at the comments, you’ll even find yourself reading gibberish about whether genderless “she” or singular “they” should be preferred. Off-topic troll alarm!

No one doubts the general usefulness of code being testable. If it’s feasible to add automated tests with a reasonable amount of effort, no one sane will question those tests. But where does this anti-static dogma come from? Every project manager will love engineers that follow 80/20 rules. In the end of the day, good software is defined by the added value to all stakeholders. There’s no right or wrong. Instead, there are “50 shades of mockable”. And with a bit of humour we’ll get something in between project day 1 and day 238:

Image found on reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/webdev/comments/1i0vwh/my_reaction_when_someone_offers_to_contribute/

Just face it. Static is a tool like any other tool. It has its merits. And its drawbacks. Choose the tool where it fits and review your overly strict rule set where needed. Being dogmatic will eventually lead to greater chaos than being pragmatic, Try to bebe efficient rather than to fight “evil”. Mocks have their place, as do integration tests.

For those looking for more rants and trolling comments, they can be seen in this article here, where more mocking is advertised in a database context:
http://architects.dzone.com/articles/easy-mocking-your-database-0

And after that. Let’s get back to work and produce something that focuses on adding value!