Top 10 Most Popular Articles on the jOOQ Blog

What do people do when they run out of topics? They recycle previous topics and create top 10 lists. Here is a list of the top 10 most popular articles from the jOOQ blog:

  1. Top 10 Very Very VERY Important Topics to Discuss
     
    A fun, not so serious parody on what is being discussed on reddit’s /r/programming. Hint: Bikeshedding topics are the most popular. Like this one. That was so meta!
     
  2. 10 Subtle Best Practices when Coding Java
     
    This is a really interesting article about not-so-common advice that might be handy every once in a while.
     
  3. 10 Common Mistakes Java Developers Make when Writing SQL
     
    A classic and must-read for all SQL developers (not only those that usually write Java)
     
  4. SQL Trick: row_number() is to SELECT what dense_rank() is to SELECT DISTINCT
     
    We’re surprised ourselves that this is so popular. But it appears that we’re really well ranked on Google when people are looking for ROW_NUMBER() and DENSE_RANK(). And the trick is very useful, of course!
     
  5. Why You Should NOT Implement Layered Architectures
     
    What a silly rant! And how it went up in the ranking within only two days! This is not really very serious advice. Obviuosly, you should (as always) do what fits best to your problem domain. But we wanted to make people think about the status quo and how it is often applied too rigidly, without thinking about all the options. Looks like we’ve hit a sweet spot with developers frustrated with overengineered applications…
     
  6. MIT Prof. Michael Stonebraker: “The Traditional RDBMS Wisdom is All Wrong”
     
    Michael Stonebraker is a very controversial person per se. In this article, we’re linking to a talk by Stonebraker where he claims (again) that the RDBMS end is nigh. A year later, we can see that NoSQL is still on the rise, whereas NewSQL is still no where. See also the next article…
     
  7. The 10 Most Popular DB Engines (SQL and NoSQL)
     
    This is an interpretation of a popular ranking of (R)DBMS, showing that even if Oracle, MySQL, and SQL Server are the most wide-spread databases, something’s about to change.
     
  8. Does Java 8 Still Need LINQ? Or is it Better than LINQ?
     
    Again, controversy is king. Of course, LINQ is awesome and often we wish we had something like LINQ in Java. In this article, however, we’re claiming that with Java 8’s Streams API and lambda expressions, we might no longer need LINQ, as collections transformation is already sufficiently covered, and LINQ-to-SQL is not what made LINQ popular (which is where jOOQ is more useful)
     
  9. 10 More Common Mistakes Java Developers Make when Writing SQL
     
    A follow-up article to the previous, very popular article about common SQL mistakes. Yes, there’s a lot to learn in this area.
     
  10. The Java Fluent API Designer Crash Course
     
    From a jOOQ perspective, this is one of the most interesting articles explaining the very simple and easy-to-apply rules that we’re using to produce our API in the form of an internal domain-specific language. If you want to build jOOQ for your own query language (e.g. Cassandra’s CQL), just follow these simple rules
     

Thanks for reading our blog! We promise to keep you up to date with more interesting (and occasionally useless) content!

jOOQ Newsletter November 14, 2013

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jOOQ Blog License now CC-BY-SA

Next to providing you with the best Java / SQL integration on the market, we’re also passionate bloggers on the matter of Java, SQL and Open Source. We think that with our experience around jOOQ, we should be major influencers on those subjects in general.

Our blog at blog.jooq.org will have reached the 200k hits threshold by the end of the week and we’ll most certainly celebrate that. Our topics and insights are increasingly appreciated by a wider and wider audience outside of the jOOQ user base, also on our syndication partners DZone (where we’ve had around 800k readers so far), JCG(readers unknown) and Tech.Pro (100k reads so far). The recent success shows that our marketing efforts pay off. Here are some stats from the jOOQ blog:

Because our blog is reaching far beyond our user base, we have decided to license its content under the terms of the CC-BY-SA 3.0 license, a permissive license that reflects our Open Source spirit. You may thus freely use our content for commercial purposes, if you attribute authorship to us. Please contact us, if you’re not sure how to create appropriate attribution.

Dual Licensing. An Experience Report

A month ago, we started dual-licensing jOOQ. We are happy to see that our competitors follow our lead in offering commercial services around their software. This is a strong indicator for having done something right. Here’s a little review from Data Geekery about the recent events around our new licensing model.

We have to admit that switching over from a very permissive Open Source license to more restrictive dual-licensing wasn’t exactly a walk in the park. Getting legal aspects right wasn’t easy. How many Open Source products out there do you think are neglecting due diligence with respect to copyright? Our estimate: 95%.

Yet, removing commercial database support from the jOOQ Open Source Edition has had only little impact on the number of downloads, nonetheless. After a short break in August / September (no jOOQ 3.1 patch releases), jOOQ 3.2 is almost as strong as ever as can be seen in this chart originating from oss.sonatype.org:

This doesn’t even count the number of downloads from www.jooq.org/download, or from SourceForge, before we removed the SourceForge download channel. The same effect can be seen on Stack Overflow and on GitHub, where jOOQ has had a significant increase of traction in the last 2-3 months!

Furthermore, with our recent discussions with the Apache GORA and Apache CloudStack guys, we’re positive that dual-licensing won’t keep jOOQ out of the professional Open Source world.

At the same time, sales talks around tailor-made agreements with medium and large customers are ongoing. We’re considering our work of the last 4 months a great success and we’re positive to be able to provide you with a much better jOOQ in the near future by creating professional Open Source software built on solid financial grounds, which everyone can greatly profit from.

Upcoming Events

As mentioned in the October newsletter, Lukas is going to be present at a number of events in the near future, talking about jOOQ and other database related stuff. ThejOOQ presentation at Topconf in beautiful Tallinn, Estonia has had around 35 attendants – well, it was hard to compete with the Google Glass presentation :-)

Upcoming events include

Stay informed about 2014 events on www.jooq.org/news.

SQL Zone – ORM (Un)Popularity

We’re personally thrilled by the fact that the ORM debate is far from over, even more than half a decade after the vietnam of computer science was first recognised. We firmly believe that ORMs are a very leaky abstraction, which is fine in “top-down” engineering approaches where the relational database is a second-class citizen.

But many companies don’t think that should be the case. Many companies want their data to be the first-class citizen, processed by more volatile entities, such as Java programs. It often just doesn’t make sense to have the data abide by the rules of the ORM. It is thus not surprising that Charles Humble from InfoQ has again detected increasing discomfort with ORMs at QCon and other conferences.

In our opinion, there’s a simple reason for this. SQL is constantly evolving, but JPA isn’t. Most importantly, JPA doesn’t do SQL as understood by the ISO / IEC standards. And it doesn’t look as though that’s going to change. Read our blog post on that subject.

SQL Zone – The History of NoSQL

A witty remark about what NoSQL really is has recently been made at the O’Reilly Strata Conference in London, where Mark Madsen, a popular researcher and analyst was walking around with a geeky T-Shirt depicting the History of NoSQL.

We sincerely hope that this awesome piece of humour will go viral. See for yourself:
https://twitter.com/edd/status/400190499585544192/photo/1

Clearly, betting on the “SQL horse” isn’t such a bad bet after all.

Tech Pro: Next Generation Social Content Syndication

Some established content syndicators and discussion platforms include DZone and JCG, my two blog syndication partners. For a content producer like me, such platforms are very interesting, as 10% of their traffic eventually reaches my blog. But there’s room for improvement with these syndicators, as their appearance is not up to date with the latest HTML5 / Frontend developments. DZone uses what appears to be a home-grown editing tool chain, whereas JCG is simply a very large wordpress blog.

Other platforms that are highly relevant but not really up to date with the latest frontend developments include Oracle’s OTN, O’Reilly’s On Java, and The Server Side

TECH.PRO

TECH.PRO. The Tech.Pro logo is a trademark of SIOPCO

Here’s a new-comer, which you should definitely keep an eye on: Tech.Pro, combining a very lean, responsive, intuitive and modern web UI with high-quality articles and social networking. The platform feels fully integrated, something that one wants to participate in.

Not only their website, but also their newsletter is nicely done, with cute images accompanying every post.

Tech.Pro is certainly something to keep an eye on in the near future!

nerd-table-cool-table

Awesome Tweets About Recent Blog Post

When writing blog posts, most people are striving to create great content. Creating great content is very hard. Most often, content is niche content, irrelevant content, overlooked content, boring content, advertising content.

But every now and then, great content is created. Often by accident or by luck. How to recognise great content? By checking twitter. Thanks, jOOQ community for being there and sharing your humour and insights with the public. You’re making jOOQ what it is. Here’s some jOOQ community humour:

awesome-blog-reactions

The Great Benevolent Dictator Getting Some Beating

I know how it feels to be a benevolent dictator. I am one myself on my jOOQ User Group. Supporting Free Open Source Software isn’t always easy. Sometimes you get demanding users, sometimes you get grumpy bugfixers. And the occasional troll. You try to be nice and sometimes, you make mistakes, too. But hey, even if it’s free and Open Source, that’s not an excuse for being rude towards your users (= customers!). Except, of course, for The One Great Benevolent Dictator. Everyone should know by now who I’m talking about. But not everyone accepts his rudeness. As seen on the Linux Kernel List:

https://lkml.org/lkml/2013/7/15/427

Enjoy!

Blog has “moved”

The jOOQ blog has moved to a new domain:

https://blog.jooq.org/

The old wordpress domain will still be active, though

Developer blog started for interesting insights in Java, SQL and jOOQ

On this blog, I’d like to share my thoughts about developing in Java and SQL, and my “middleware passion” jOOQ.

Java and databases are my professional passion. When they work together, great software can evolve. Many proprietary and standard ideas have been around to make them work together. I feel that there is yet one missing piece glueing them together more intuitively. That’s why I created jOOQ:

jOOQ effectively combines complex SQL, typesafety, source code generation, active records, stored procedures, advanced data types, and Java in a fluent, intuitive DSL.