jOOQ Newsletter: April 2, 2014

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Tweet of the Day

Our customers, users, and followers are sharing their love for jOOQ to the world. Here are:

Arturo Tena who simply loves jOOQ 3.3, and expresses this with a creative transformation of our version numbering scheme:

Florin T.Pătraşcu who cannot stop integrating jOOQ with MicroMVC, because he discovers more and more new features all the time:

Thanks for the shouts, guys!

New license models – available soon

In the early days of migrating towards dual-licensing, we’ve discussed many alternative licensing models with our long-term users and early adopters. Now, we’re almost ready to publish the new, additional license terms, which are due for next week. They essentially include:

  • The existing yearly subscription for default use-cases
  • A new monthly subscription for short-running tasks, such as DB migrations
  • A new major release perpetual license for long-running jOOQ integrations with little need for upgrades

With these options, we believe that we will be able to cover even more jOOQ integration use-cases from a legal perspective, helping to further improve your jOOQ experience.

Are you an existing customer of the jOOQ yearly subscription interested in a switch to other terms? Do not hesitate to contact sales for a tailor-made migration offer.

Java Zone – Java 8 is out

Java 8 has finally been released by Oracle, a moment we’ve been waiting for quite a while now. Unsurprisingly, blogs in all corners of the web have started publishing Java and Java 8 related articles. We absolutely agree with Craig Buckler claiming Java to be the best programming language to learn in 2014.

Want to stay up to date with examples, tutorials, insights on Java 8? Follow ourJava 8 Friday blog series, then. Every Friday, we’re publishing an insightful article on a specific area of Java that will be affected by Java 8. One of the most interesting articles that has even caught the attention of Erik Meijer is Dr. Ming-Yee Iu’s guest post about JINQ and JINQ-to-jOOQ, which you should be looking out for in the next 6 months.

For more great resources, see also our blogging partner Baeldung.com’s Java 8 resources collection.

SQL Zone – In-Memory Computing

Do you know your fastest way around in-memory computing with Oracle? It’s possible, but it’s not so trivial.

If you’re used to SQL Server, you would simply create a T-SQL temporary table, which is a typesafe in-memory table for use with procedural T-SQL.

In Oracle, you have two choices to do the same:

  • Using SQL TABLE OF OBJECT types
  • Using GLOBAL TEMPORARY TABLEs

In almost all cases, GLOBAL TEMPORARY TABLEs will outperform TABLE OF OBJECT types for a very simple reason: You can perform all operations in the SQL engine only, whereas with TABLE OF OBJECT types, you will have to resort to the PL/SQL engine to keep the table in memory. With significant amounts of data, this can become quite a problem.

Want to know more? Visit our recent Stack Overflow question on the subject.

Upcoming Events

Have you missed any of our previous jOOQ talks? Soon you’ll get another chance to hear us talk about jOOQ or SQL in general in any of these upcoming events:

Stay informed about 2014 events on www.jooq.org/news.

A History of Databases in “No-tation”

We’re heading towards very exciting times in the field of databases!

At Topconf in beautiful Tallin, Estonia, Nikita Ivanov (founder and CEO of GridGain Systems) was talking about how the ever crumbling price of DRAM gets in-memory computing and thus in-memory databases within the reach of being affordable by even small and medium enterprises. Nikita claims that 99% of all companies have less than 10TB of transactional data. While this has been completely impossible ten years ago, nowadays, you can store that much data in memory for less than 15000 USD! Compared to the Oracle license that you might buy with the server, that’s almost nothing. Imagine that you can scale up several orders of magnitude without changing your “legacy” architecture. Without switching to something like NoSQL.

A day before, Christoph Engelbert presented Hazelcast, a competitor product of GridGain Systems. Unfortunately, I couldn’t attend his talk but I was lucky enough to spend a couple of hours with Christoph on the flight back home. He’s a very interesting and fun guy to talk to and gave me quite some insight about what his company is evangelising in the context of “Big Data”. Essentially, modern data processing involves moving computation towards data, instead of moving data towards computation. While Hazelcast solves this through their own storage mechanisms, this paradigm has been equally true for “legacy” OLAP systems based on relational databases. Using PL/SQL, or T-SQL, or any other procedural language, you can execute complex algorithms right where the data is: In your database.

For those of you frequently following my blog, you will not be surprised that I am very thrilled about the above evolutions in data computing. The ever increasing consternation with ORMs and the big amount of confusion about the future of “NoSQL” have lead to a recent revival of SQL as a language.

Back to the roots.

This seems to have culminated at the recent O’Reilly Strata Conference, where Mark Madsen, a popular researcher and analyst was walking around with a geeky T-Shirt showing the History of NoSQL. I’ve had a brief chat with him on Twitter. He might be selling this T-Shirt, if it goes viral.

History of NoSQL by Mark Madsen. Picture by Ed Dumbill

History of NoSQL by Mark Madsen. Picture published by Edd Dumbill

So apparently, SQL is back, and strong as ever!