jOOQ Tuesdays: Nicolai Parlog Talks About Java 9

Welcome to the jOOQ Tuesdays series. In this series, we’ll publish an article on the third Tuesday every other month where we interview someone we find exciting in our industry from a jOOQ perspective. This includes people who work with SQL, Java, Open Source, and a variety of other related topics.

I’m very excited to feature today Nicolai Parlog, author of The Java Module System

Nicolai, your blog is an “archeological” treasure trove for everyone who wants to learn about why Java expert group decisions were made. What made you dig out all these interesting discussions on the mailing lists?

Ha, thank you, didn’t know I was sitting on a treasure.

It all started with everyone’s favorite bikeshed: Optional. After using it for a few months, I was curious to learn more about the reason behind its introduction to Java and why it was designed the way it was, so I started digging and learned a few things:

  • Piperman, the JDK mailing list archive, is a horrible place to peruse and search.
  • Mailing list discussions are often lengthy, fragmented, and thus hard to revisit.
  • Brian Goetz was absolutely right: Everything related to Optional seems to take 300 messages.

Consequently, researching that post about Optional’s design took a week or so. But as you say, it’s interesting to peek behind the curtain and once a discussion is condensed to its most relevant positions and peppered with some context it really appeals to the wider Java community.

I actually think there’s a niche to be filled, here. Imagine there were a site that did regularly (at least once a week) what I did with a few selected topics: Follow the JDK mailing list, summarize ongoing discussions, and make them accessible to a wide audience. That would be a great service to the Java community as it would make it much easier to follow what is going on and to chime in with an informed opinion when you feel you have something to contribute. Now we just need to find someone with a lot of free time on their hands.

By the way, I think it’s awesome that the comparitively open development of the JDK makes that possible.

I had followed your blog after Java 8 came out, where you explained expert group decisions in retrospect. Now, you’re mostly covering what’s new in Java 9. What are your favourite “hidden” (i.e. non-Jigsaw) Java 9 features and why?

From the few language changes, it’s easy pickings: definitely private interface methods. I’ve been in the situation more than once that I wanted to share code between default methods but found no good place to put it without making it part of the public API. With private mehods in interfaces, that’s a thing of the past.

When it comes to API changes, the decision is much harder as there is more to choose from. People definitely like collection factory methods and I do, too, but I think I’ll go with the changes to Stream and Optional. I really enjoy using those Java 8 features and think it’s great that they’ve been improved in 9.

A JVM feature I really like are multi-release JARs. The ability to ship a JAR that uses the newest APIs, but degrades gracefully on older JVMs will come in very handy. Some projects, Spring for example, already do this, but without JVM support it’s not exactly pleasant.

Can I go on? Because there’s so much more! Just two: Unified logging makes it much easier to tease out JVM log messages without having to configure logging for different subsystems and compact strings and indified string concatenation make working with strings faster, reduce garbage and conserve heap space (on average, 10% to 15% less memory!). Ok, that were three, but there you go.

You’re writing a book on the Java 9 module system that can already be pre-ordered on Manning. What will readers get out of your book?

All they need to become module system experts. Of course it explains all the basics (delcaring, compiling, packaging, and running modular applications) and advanced features (services, implied readability, optional dependencies, etc), but it goes far beyond that. More than how to use a feature it also explains when and why to use it, which nuances to consider, and what are good defaults if you’re not sure which way to go.

It’s also full of practical advice. I migrated two large applications to Java 9 (compiling and running on the new release, not turning them into modules) and that experience as well as the many discussions on the mailing list informed a big chapter on migration. If readers are interested in a preview, I condensed it into a post on the most common Java 9 migration challenges. I also show how to debug modules and the module system with various tools (JDeps for example) and logging (that’s when I started using uniform logging), Last but not least, I plan to include a chapter that simply lists error messages and what to do about them.

In your opinion, what are the good parts and the bad parts about  Jigsaw? Do you think Jigsaw will be adopted quickly?

The good, the bad, and the ugly, eh? My favorite feature (of all of Java 9 actually) is strong encapsulation. The ability to have types that are public only within a module is incredibly valuable! This adds another option to the private-to-public-axis and once people internalize that feature we will wonder how we ever lived without it. Can you imagine giving up private? We will think the same about exported.

I hope the worst aspect of the module system will be the compatibility challenges. That’s a weird way to phrase it, but let me explain. These challenges definitely exist and they will require a non-neglectable investmement from the Java community as a whole to get everything working on Java 9, in the long run as modules. (As an aside: This is well invested time – much of it pays back technical debt.)

My hope is that no other aspect of the module system turns out to be worse. One thing I’m a little concerned about is the strictness of reliable configuration. I like the general principle and I’m definitely one for enforcing good practices, but just think about all those POMs that busily exclude transitive dependencies. Once all those JARs are modules, that won’t work – the module system will not let you launch without all dependencies present.

Generally speaking, the module system makes it harder to go against the maintainers’ decisions. Making internal APIs available via reflection or altering dependencies now goes against the grain of a mechanism that is built deeply into the compiler and JVM. There are of course a number of command line flags to affect the module system but they don’t cover everything. To come back to exclusing dependencies, maybe–ignore-missing-modules ${modules} would be a good idea…

Regarding adoption rate, I expect it to be slower than Java 8. But leaving those projects aside that see every new version as insurmountable and are still on Java 6, I’m sure the vast majority will migrate eventually. If not for Java 9’s features than surely for future ones. As a friend and colleague once said: “I’ll do everything to get to value types.”

Now that Java 9 is out and “legacy”, what Java projects will you cover next in your blog and your work?

Oh boy, I’m still busy with Java 9. First I have to finish the book (November hopefully) and then I want to do a few more migrations because I actually like doing that for some weird and maybe not entirely healthy reason (the things you see…). FYI, I’m for hire, so if readers are stuck with their migration they should reach out.

Beyond that, I’m already looking forward to primitive specialization, e.g. ArrayList<int>, and value types (both from Project Valhalla) as well as the changes Project Amber will bring to Java. I’m sure I’ll start discussing those in 2018.

Another thing I’ll keep myself busy with and which I would love your readers to check out is my YouTube channel. It’s still very young and until the book’s done I won’t do a lot of videos (hope to record one next week), but I’m really thrilled about the whole endavour!

10 Java Articles Everyone Must Read

One month ago, we’ve published a list of 10 SQL Articles Everyone Must Read. A list of articles that we believe would add exceptional value to our readers on the jOOQ blog. The jOOQ blog is a blog focusing on both Java and SQL, so it is only natural that today, one month later, we’re publishing an equally exciting list of 10 Java articles everyone must read.

Note that by “must read”, we may not specifically mean the particular linked article only, but also other works from the same authors, who have been regular bloggers over the past years and never failed to produce new interesting content!

Here goes…

1. Brian Goetz: “Stewardship: the Sobering Parts”

The first blog post is actually not a blog post but a recording of a very interesting talk by Brian Goetz on Oracle’s stewardship of Java. On the jOOQ blog, we’ve been slightly critical about 1-2 features of the Java language in the past, e.g. when comparing it to Scala, or Ceylon.

Brian makes good points about why it would not be a good idea for Java to become just as “modern” as quickly as other languages. A must-watch for every Java developer (around 1h)

2. Aleksey Shipilёv: The Black Magic of (Java) Method Dispatch

In recent years, the JVM has seen quite a few improvements, including invokedynamic that arrived in Java 7 as a prerequisite for Java 8 lambdas, as well as a great tool for other, more dynamic languages built on top of the JVM, such as Nashorn.

invokedynamic is only a small, “high level” puzzle piece in the advanced trickery performed by the JVM. What really happens under the hood when you call methods? How are they resolved, optimised by the JIT? Aleksey’s article sub-title reveals what the article is really about:

“Everything you wanted to know about Black Deviously Surreptitious Magic in low-level performance engineering”

Definitely not a simple read, but a great post to learn about the power of the JVM.

Read Aleksey’s “The Black Magic of (Java) Method Dispatch

3. Oliver White: Java Tools and Technologies Landscape for 2014

We’re already in 2015, but this report by Oliver White (at the time head of ZeroTurnaround’s RebelLabs) had been exceptionally well executed and touches pretty much everything related to the Java ecosystem.

Read Oliver’s “Java Tools and Technologies Landscape for 2014

4. Peter Lawrey: Java Lambdas and Low Latency

When Aleksey has introduced us to some performance semantics in the JVM, Peter takes this one step further, talking about low latency in Java 8. We could have picked many other useful little blog posts from Peter’s blog, which is all about low-latency, high performance computing on the JVM, sometimes even doing advanced off-heap trickery.

Read Peter’s “Java Lambdas and Low Latency

5. Nicolai Parlog: Everything You Need To Know About Default Methods

Nicolai is a newcomer in the Java blogosphere, and a very promising one, too. His well-researched articles go in-depth about some interesting facts related to Java 8, digging out old e-mails from the expert group’s mailing list, explaining the decisions they made to conclude with what we call Java 8 today.

Read Nicolai’s “Everything You Need To Know About Default Methods

6. Lukas Eder: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Java

This list wouldn’t be complete without listing another list that we wrote ourselves on the jOOQ blog. Java is an old beast with 20 years of history this year in 2015. This old beast has a lot of secrets and caveats that many people have forgotten or never thought about. We’ve uncovered them for you:

Read Lukas’s “10 Things You Didn’t Know About Java

7. Edwin Dalorzo: Why There Is Interface Pollution in Java 8

Edwin has been responding to our own blog posts a couple of times in the past with very well researched and thoroughly thought through articles, in particular about Java 8 related features, e.g. comparing Java 8 Streams with LINQ (something that we’ve done ourselves, as well).

This particular article explains why there are so many different and differently named functional interfaces in Java 8.

Read Edwin’s “Why There Is Interface Pollution in Java 8

8. Vlad Mihalcea: How Does PESSIMISTIC_FORCE_INCREMENT Lock Mode Work

When Java talks to databases, many people default to using Hibernate for convenience (see also 3. Oliver White: Java Tools and Technologies Landscape for 2014). Hibernate’s main vision, however, is not to add convenience – you can get that in many other ways as well. Hibernate’s main vision is to provide powerful means of navigating and persisting an object graph representation of your RDBMS’s data model, including various ways of locking.

Vlad is an extremely proficient Hibernate user, who has a whole blog series on how Hibernate works going. We’ve picked a recent, well-researched article about locking, but we strongly suggest you read the other articles as well:

Read Vlad’s “How Does PESSIMISTIC_FORCE_INCREMENT Lock Mode Work

9. Petri Kainulainen: Writing Clean Tests

This isn’t a purely Java-related blog post, although it is written from the perspective of a Java developer. Modern development involves testing – automatic testing – and lots of it. Petri has written an interesting blog series about writing clean tests in Java – you shouldn’t miss his articles!

Read Petri’s “Writing Clean Tests

10. Eugen Paraschiv: Java 8 Resources Collection

If you don’t already have at least 9 open tabs with interesting stuff to read after this list, get ready for a browser tab explosion! Eugen Paraschiv who maintains baeldung.com has been collecting all sorts of very interesting resources related to Java 8 in a single link collection. You should definitely bookmark this collection and check back frequently for interesting changes:

Read Eugen’s “Java 8 Resources Collection

Many other articles

There are, of course, many other very good articles providing deep insight into useful Java tricks. If you find you’ve encountered an article that would nicely complement this list, please leave a link and description in the comments section. Future readers will appreciate the additional insight.