jOOQ Newsletter: July 2, 2014 – jOOLY 20% Discount Offering

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jOOLY 2014 20% Discount Offering

Have you been evaluating jOOQ for a while now, still hesitating to purchase licenses? Or are you an existing customer and looking into licensing more workstations for your team? This is your chance!

Get 20% off all your jOOQ purchases in the month of jOOLY 2014!

Google has their summer of code, we have our month of jOOLY, where you get 20% off all your purchases for jOOQ Professional and Enterprise Edition licenses. Just enter the “jOOLY” discount code with your next purchase and start coding awesome Java / SQL code! Click here to download and buy jOOQ now! The discount code is only valid until the end of jOOLY (July 31, 2014), so act quickly!

In fact, if you purchase jOOQ in the month of jOOLY (July), we’ll offer you a free PDF e-book copy of SQL Performance Explained with your purchase to help you get even more out of your jOOQ experience.

This discount cannot be combined with other discounts. Only the first period of a monthly or yearly subscription is discounted. Existing subscriptions are not eligible for this discount

Tweet of the Day

Our customers, users, and followers are sharing their love for jOOQ with the world and we can hardly catch up with them! Here are:

“Henk”, who challenges the JavaEE folks to add jOOQ to the standards. It’s about time!

Roland Tepp, who sees the added value of jOOQ in “database-first” applications. That’s very true

Chris Raastad, who … well. Who puts it bluntly and is looking forward to use the “last missing features” from .NET also in Java. We’re honoured to be compared to LINQ. Thanks Chris!

Thanks for the shouts, guys! You make the jOOQ experience rock!

Community Zone – The jOOQ aficionados have been active!

The jOOQ community has been very active again in the last month. We’re happy to point out these editor’s picks from our radar:

Speaking of LINQ, you may have heard of JINQ. JINQ now also has a jOOQ integration, allowing you to query the awesome the Java 8 Streams API as if it were a database. With jOOQ being the backing SQL implementation, you get all the advantages like typesafety, SQL transformation and standardisation, etc. So, let’s hear it for Dr. Ming-Yee Iu, from whom we’ll certainly hear more in the near future.

Instil Software from Belfast is hosting this great jOOQ and Flyway workshop on July 16, 2014. “Unfortunately,” it is already sold out, but we’re sure that this killer productivity combination will be interesting for numerous future workshops. If you’re missing out on it, read this blog post to get an overview of jOOQ and Flyway. If you’re hosting such a workshop yourself, let us know. We’ll be more than happy to advertise it in our events section of the jOOQ website.

If you haven’t seen it already, consider reading the ZeroTurnaround Java Tools and Technologies Landscape for 2014, a survey of 2164 Java professionals (slightly biased towards ZeroTurnaround’s RebelLabs audience). jOOQ is listed and compared to other Java / SQL integration patterns. We’re clearly catching up with well-established brands like MyBatis – so stay tuned for more community news as we keep growing.

Feedback zone

You’ve read to the end of this newsletter, that’s great! Did you like it? What did we do great? What can we improve? What other subjects would you like us to cover?

We’d love to hear from you, so if you want to reach out to us, just drop a message to contact@datageekery.com. Looking forward to hearing from you!

Java Rocks More Than Ever

On the TIOBE index, Java and C have been sharing the #1 and #2 rank for a long time now, and with the recent GA release of the JDK 8, things are not going to get any worse for our community.

Java simply rocks! And it’s the best platform to build almost any of your applications, out there.

But why does Java rock so much? Is it the JVM? Is it the backwards-compatibility? Is it the easy syntax? Or the millions of free and commercial software available to build your software? All of this and much more.

The Top 10 Reasons why Java Rocks More Than Ever

ZeroTurnaround’s RebelLabs often publish awesome blog posts, which we can only recommend. In this case, we’ve discovered a very well-written series of blog posts explaining why Java is so great in 10 steps, by ZeroTurnaround’s Geert Bevin. The articles include:

Part 1: The Java Compiler

The compiler is one of the things we take for granted in any language, without thinking about its great features. In Java, unlike C++, you can simply compile your code without thinking too much about linking, optimisation and all sorts of other usual compiler features. This is partially due to the JIT (Just In Time compiler), which does further compilation work at runtime.

Read the full article here

Part 2: The Core API

The JDK’s core API consists of a very solid, stable and well-understood set of libraries. While many people complain about the lack of functionality in this area (resorting to Google Guava or Apache Commons), people often forget that the core API is still the one that is underneath all those extensions. Again, from a C++ perspective, this is a truly luxurious situation.

Read the full article here

Part 3: Open Source

In this section, ZeroTurnaround’s Geert Bevin‘s mind-set aligns well with our own at Data Geekery when it comes to the spirit of Open Source – no matter whether this is about free-as-in-freedom, or free-as-in-beer, the point is that so many things about Java are “open”. We’re all in this together.

Read the full article here

Part 4: The Java Memory Model

Again, a very interesting point of view from someone with a solid C++ background. We’re taking many things for granted as Java has had a very good threading and memory model from the beginning, which was corrected only once in the JDK 1.5 in 2004, and which has built a solid grounds for newer API like actor-based ones, Fork/JOIN, etc.

Read the full article here

Part 5: High-Performance JVM

The JVM is the most obvious thing to talk about it has allowed for so many languages to work on so many hardware environments, and it runs so fast, nowadays!

Read the full article here

Part 6: Bytecode

… and the JVM also rocks because of bytecode, of course. Bytecode is a vendor-independent abstraction of machine code, which is very predictable and can be generated, manipulated, and transformed by various technologies. We’ve recently had a guest post by Dr. Ming-Yee Iu who has shown how bytecode transformations can be used to emulate LINQ in Java. Let’s hear it for bytecode!

Read the full article here

Part 7: Intelligent IDEs

15 years ago, developing software worked quite differently. People can write assembler or C programs with vi or Notepad. But when you’re writing a very complex enterprise-scale Java program, you wouldn’t want to miss IDEs, nowadays. We’ve blogged about various reasons why SQLJ has died. The lack of proper IDE support was one of them.

Read the full article here

Part 8: Profiling Tools

Remember when Oracle released Java Mission Control for free developer use with the JDK 7u40? Profiling is something very very awesome. With modern profilers, you can know exactly where your bottleneck is by simply measuring every aspect of your JVM. You don’t have to guess, you can know. How powerful is that?

Read the full article here

Part 9: Backwards Compatibility

While backwards-compatibility has its drawbacks, too, it is still very impressive how long the Java language, the JVM, and the JDK have existed so far without introducing any major backwards-compatibility regressions. The only thing that comes to mind is the introduction of keywords like assert and enum.

Could you imagine introducing the Java 8 Streams API, lambda expressions, default methods, generics, enums, and loads of other features without ever breaking anything? That’s just great!

Read the full article here

Part 10: Maturity With Innovation

In fact, this article is a summary of all the others, saying that Java has been a very well-designed and mature platform from the beginning without ever ceasing to innovate. And it’s true. With Java 8, a great next step has been published that will – again – change the way the enterprise perceives software development for good.

Read the full article here

Java Rocks More Than Ever

It does, and it’s a great great platform with a bright future for all its community participants.

How to Make Your Advertisement Look Like Spam

I had experienced ZeroTurnaround‘s marketing and sales before, and I thought it was a bit agressive, although their products seem really nice and cool, so I had forgiven them at the time… However, looking at the numerous links to their product JRebel on CodeRanch just looks like quite offending spam to me. Consider an arbitrary question:
http://www.coderanch.com/t/294530/JDBC/databases/NullPointerException-stmt-executeUpdate

The question is about a silly NullPointerException and its answer is straightforward. Now the JRebel link at the bottom:

I agree. Here's the link

I agree. Here’s the link…

“I agree. Here’s the link” – Whatever. Completely off-topic, no? It looks as though CodeRanch had a spam filtering problem which was exploited by a decent company selling decent products. Why would they do that? Well, I understand that being able to put your link on one of the Top 20 Java Websites can be good for search engine optimisation. But making it look like spam will probably start pissing off potential customers, no?

The crazy thing is, it really isn’t spam, it’s a regular advertisement on CodeRanch. Scroll down on this question here:
http://www.coderanch.com/t/376762/java/java/ArrayList-maintain-order

I’m really curious if this advertisement works out for ZeroTurnaround! I’m also curious about your opinion, and whether you also think this is spammy.