Is Your Eclipse Running a Bit Slow? Just Use This Simple Trick!

You wouldn’t believe it until you try it yourself. I’ve been using the Eclipse Mars developer milestones lately, and I’ve been having some issues with slow compilation. I always thought it was because of the m2e integration, which has never been famous for working perfectly. But then, it dawned upon me when I added a JPA persistence.xml file to run some jOOQ + Hibernate tests… I ran into this issue, and googled it to learn that many people are complaining about JPA validation running forever in their Eclipses.

So I searched for how to deactivate that, and boom!

All of my Eclipse got much much faster

In fact, I didn’t just deactivate JPA validation, but all validation:

deactivate all validation in your Eclipse to boost performance

I don’t remember the last time I ever needed validation, or thought that it was a useful feature in the first place. If you want to help your whole team, you can also check in the following file in each of your projects’ .settings/org.eclipse.wst.validation.prefs files:

DELEGATES_PREFERENCE=delegateValidatorList
USER_BUILD_PREFERENCE=enabledBuildValidatorListorg.eclipse.wst.wsi.ui.internal.WSIMessageValidator;
USER_MANUAL_PREFERENCE=enabledManualValidatorListorg.eclipse.wst.wsi.ui.internal.WSIMessageValidator;
USER_PREFERENCE=overrideGlobalPreferencestruedisableAllValidationtrueversion1.2.600.v201501211647
eclipse.preferences.version=1
override=true
suspend=true
vf.version=3

This has the same effect, but can be checked into version control.

Found this tip useful? See also our list of Top 5 Useful Hidden Eclipse Features

The Myth About Slow SQL JOIN Operations

In my recent SQL work for a large Swiss bank, I have maintained nested database view monsters whose unnested SQL code amounted up to 5k lines of code, joining the same table over and over again in separate subselects combined via UNION operations. This monster performed in way under 50ms, no matter how we queried it (see “10 more common mistakes” about the speed of queries). Of course, this performance was only achieved after lots of fine-tuning, load-testing and benchmarking. But it worked. Our Oracle database never let us down on these things.

Nonetheless, many SQL users think that JOIN operations are slow. Why? Perhaps because they are / used to be, in MySQL? I’m currently reading this interesting book by Markus Winand. The book is called SQL Performance Explained. He’s also the author of Use-The-Index-Luke.com where you can get free insight into his book. I still recommend reading the whole book, though. Even SQL old-timers and SQL nerds like me will find 1-2 novel, very interesting approaches, some of which will be incorporated into jOOQ very soon!

In particular, consider this page which explains very well how Hash JOIN operations work:
http://use-the-index-luke.com/sql/join/hash-join-partial-objects