Is Your Eclipse Running a Bit Slow? Just Use This Simple Trick!

You wouldn’t believe it until you try it yourself. I’ve been using the Eclipse Mars developer milestones lately, and I’ve been having some issues with slow compilation. I always thought it was because of the m2e integration, which has never been famous for working perfectly. But then, it dawned upon me when I added a JPA persistence.xml file to run some jOOQ + Hibernate tests… I ran into this issue, and googled it to learn that many people are complaining about JPA validation running forever in their Eclipses.

So I searched for how to deactivate that, and boom!

All of my Eclipse got much much faster

In fact, I didn’t just deactivate JPA validation, but all validation:

deactivate all validation in your Eclipse to boost performance

I don’t remember the last time I ever needed validation, or thought that it was a useful feature in the first place. If you want to help your whole team, you can also check in the following file in each of your projects’ .settings/org.eclipse.wst.validation.prefs files:

DELEGATES_PREFERENCE=delegateValidatorList
USER_BUILD_PREFERENCE=enabledBuildValidatorListorg.eclipse.wst.wsi.ui.internal.WSIMessageValidator;
USER_MANUAL_PREFERENCE=enabledManualValidatorListorg.eclipse.wst.wsi.ui.internal.WSIMessageValidator;
USER_PREFERENCE=overrideGlobalPreferencestruedisableAllValidationtrueversion1.2.600.v201501211647
eclipse.preferences.version=1
override=true
suspend=true
vf.version=3

This has the same effect, but can be checked into version control.

Found this tip useful? See also our list of Top 5 Useful Hidden Eclipse Features

Annotatiomania™ in Struts 2.0

I have to admit, I have not made any experience with Struts 1.0. Neither with 2.0. From what I understand, Struts 2.0 tried to move away from XML to use annotations instead. Just like Hibernate/JPA did. They have published Struts 2.0 with this title:

Apache Struts 2 is an elegant, extensible framework for building enterprise-ready Java web applications.”

Elegant… ELEGANT! My untrained eye must be oblivious of some relevant facts. But can anyone explain to me what’s so elegant about the following code block (I can see how it is “extensible”, though)?

@Validation()
public class SimpleAnnotationAction extends ActionSupport {

    @RequiredFieldValidator(type = ValidatorType.FIELD, message = "You must enter a value for bar.")
    @IntRangeFieldValidator(type = ValidatorType.FIELD, min = "6", max = "10", message = "bar must be between ${min} and ${max}, current value is ${bar}.")
    public void setBar(int bar) {
        this.bar = bar;
    }

    public int getBar() {
        return bar;
    }

    @Validations(
            requiredFields =
                    {@RequiredFieldValidator(type = ValidatorType.SIMPLE, fieldName = "customfield", message = "You must enter a value for field.")},
            requiredStrings =
                    {@RequiredStringValidator(type = ValidatorType.SIMPLE, fieldName = "stringisrequired", message = "You must enter a value for string.")},
            emails =
                    { @EmailValidator(type = ValidatorType.SIMPLE, fieldName = "emailaddress", message = "You must enter a value for email.")},
            urls =
                    { @UrlValidator(type = ValidatorType.SIMPLE, fieldName = "hreflocation", message = "You must enter a value for email.")},
            stringLengthFields =
                    {@StringLengthFieldValidator(type = ValidatorType.SIMPLE, trim = true, minLength="10" , maxLength = "12", fieldName = "needstringlength", message = "You must enter a stringlength.")},
            intRangeFields =
                    { @IntRangeFieldValidator(type = ValidatorType.SIMPLE, fieldName = "intfield", min = "6", max = "10", message = "bar must be between ${min} and ${max}, current value is ${bar}.")},
            dateRangeFields =
                    {@DateRangeFieldValidator(type = ValidatorType.SIMPLE, fieldName = "datefield", min = "-1", max = "99", message = "bar must be between ${min} and ${max}, current value is ${bar}.")},
            expressions = {
                @ExpressionValidator(expression = "foo > 1", message = "Foo must be greater than Bar 1. Foo = ${foo}, Bar = ${bar}."),
                @ExpressionValidator(expression = "foo > 2", message = "Foo must be greater than Bar 2. Foo = ${foo}, Bar = ${bar}."),
                @ExpressionValidator(expression = "foo > 3", message = "Foo must be greater than Bar 3. Foo = ${foo}, Bar = ${bar}."),
                @ExpressionValidator(expression = "foo > 4", message = "Foo must be greater than Bar 4. Foo = ${foo}, Bar = ${bar}."),
                @ExpressionValidator(expression = "foo > 5", message = "Foo must be greater than Bar 5. Foo = ${foo}, Bar = ${bar}.")
    }
    )
    public String execute() throws Exception {
        return SUCCESS;
    }
}

Taken from the docs, here: http://struts.apache.org/2.x/docs/validation-annotation.html. Thanks to Sergio for sharing this link. I guess you can actually put Java code in annotation strings, that is compiled at run-time using some Eclipse compiler or something… Who knows? :-)