On Degrading Merchandise Quality

I’ve just replaced 4 halogen bulbs in my appartment. When I threw the old ones into our recycling bin, I’ve noticed that there were already around 8 bulbs in there. From the last 5-6 months, only! This made me sad, as it shows how our consumer society works. Read on to learn how jOOQ strives to be different with respect to endurability and long-lasting quality.

More stuff I’m made to buy because it falls apart

I’ve just bought a new mobile phone, because the old one didn’t really work anymore, after only 2 years!

I’ll be buying a new hard drive next week, because the one I’ve bought recently (to replace a broken, 3 year old one) heats up too quickly and doesn’t give me the throughput I want!

I buy 2 pairs of new Adidas a year, because they don’t last as long as my leather shoes!

I buy about 5 mini-umbrellas a year, because apparently, they’re made to last a mere 10 days of rainfall!

I buy about 2 new city bikes a year, because mending them is more expensive than buying new ones. It’s not that I’d just have to replace tires, they’re actually quite broken after 1/2 year!

I bought a Windows Surface RT tablet just to learn that almost no programs can run on it. I would have had to buy the Pro version and throw the old one away.

Should we really work this way?

I’m forced to buy new stuff. I buy new stuff because the previous stuff I’ve had breaks apart so quickly. And in many cases, it is very clear that it has been designed to break apart in a short period of time. Replacing things with new things is an industry of its own. If stuff were made to last and to work for 10 years (Hah 10 years. Our grandparents used the same stuff for 40 years!), corporations would make less money with new merchandise to replace their previous equivalent merchandise. Take my awesome Samsung flat screen TV, for instance. I had bought it around 7 year ago, and it still works like a charm. Samsung never got any money from me again, even if I’m a very happy customer. Is that a bad business plan for Samsung?

There’s more to life than making tons of money and keeping a paying customer base for your deliberately mediocre product line. There is a strong urge to contribute to making this world a better place. By selling quality products that do not fall apart very quickly. Products that do not require a lot of support. Products that are easy to use and long-lasting, such that the return on investment for your customer is extremely high, at the cost of making “only” a living instead of tons of money and waste.

At Data Geekery, producing such products is our highest credo. This is why we charge a bit of money for licensing with support included, because we think that our quality is so high, you might not even need any support. We could make a lot more money by lowering our quality and by hiring a lot of expensive consultants to explain to you how our complicated product works. But jOOQ is not complicated, it is extremely easy to use.

Many “free” Open Source products don’t work this way. They lure you in by being free and LGPL-licensed, unloading a lot of consulting and maintenance costs onto you only later on. It is your choice. Do you want to invest in your future by keeping maintenance costs low? Or do you want to get a cheap product and pay later on? Think about dirt cheap ink jet printers and how much you’ll pay on those quickly-emptying ink-cartridges later on. Think about dirt cheap coffee machines and how much you’ll pay on those capsules later on. Think about some computer products, and how often you have to pay for ridiculous updates, because the “old” minor release of the operating system is no longer supported.

Don’t think in short terms. Don’t fall for “free” stuff. There is no such thing as free lunch. You always pay. A little bit now, or much more later.

A Significant Difference Between Open Source and Commercial Software

A recent event has triggered a lot of interest in the debate about the good and the bad parts of Open Source. Oracle’s attack on Open Source. For large corporations who aren’t Red Hat, taking a stand on the topic is far from easy. Oracle used to sell only commercial software, but has since acquired a lot of open-sourcey companies, such as Sleepycat Software (BerkeleyDB) or Sun Microsystems (Java, MySQL). Phrasing a long-term strategy upon this legacy isn’t easy.

At the same time, Oracle is extremely successful, having surpassed IBM’s revenue, making Oracle the second largest software company in the world. The continuing popularity of its flagships Java and the Oracle database is promising, also for middleware vendors providing products such as jOOQ, for their flagships.

At Data Geekery, Open Source is also very important, just as commercial licensing has become, since recently. The change towards dual-licensing has been received rather positively on the jOOQ user group, even if it led to open questions about the continued Open Source strategy. But what’s the real difference between Open Source and commercial software? At Adobe, Dr. Roy Fielding is often cited saying that there is essentially no difference between Open Source and commercial software, and he’s quite an authority for both worlds. Both are absolutely viable business models with their pros and cons respectively (unfortunately, I cannot back this up with an actual citation).

One significant difference, however, is that low-quality open source software can heavily outlive low-quality commercial software, as it just never really dies, as no one is “losing money” on low OSS “sales”. I’ve recently blogged about how to recognise such low-quality Open Source software.

Open Source is foremost a business and marketing strategy, just as much as it is a mission. This business strategy can be a good or a bad choice for any software vendor.

The End of US Internet Governance

This is huge news! The Internet will finally become the global network it could’ve always been as ICANN, IANA, IETF and others simultaneously move away from US unilateral Internet governance.

http://www.internetgovernance.org/2013/10/11/the-core-internet-institutions-abandon-the-us-government/

I guess, in the end, the NSA did us all a “favour” with their spying. If this will make the internet better, or if this will introduce UN-style politics remains unclear… But it will certainly change the world. If you want to express your opinion, there’s a heated debate on www.reddit.com going on!

This Beats Everything: Koding in the Cloud

OK, now this beats everything I’ve seen so far. I can now code in the cloud with Koding.com. From a first, very quick glance, I get:

  • A VM with a terminal (looks like a Debian distribution)
  • PHP and all sorts of stuff that is already installed
  • An app store for apps like PostgreSQL or MySQL
  • 1.2 GB of free disk space and 2 GB of RAM

Wow. Coding in the cloud. Sounds awesome. What’s next!? And who are they? See the Koding, Inc. blog for their press release about opening up their services to the public:
http://blog.koding.com/2013/08/koding-is-public

VM with a terminal on Koding
VM with a terminal on Koding

Tech Pro: Next Generation Social Content Syndication

Some established content syndicators and discussion platforms include DZone and JCG, my two blog syndication partners. For a content producer like me, such platforms are very interesting, as 10% of their traffic eventually reaches my blog. But there’s room for improvement with these syndicators, as their appearance is not up to date with the latest HTML5 / Frontend developments. DZone uses what appears to be a home-grown editing tool chain, whereas JCG is simply a very large wordpress blog.

Other platforms that are highly relevant but not really up to date with the latest frontend developments include Oracle’s OTN, O’Reilly’s On Java, and The Server Side

TECH.PRO
TECH.PRO. The Tech.Pro logo is a trademark of SIOPCO

Here’s a new-comer, which you should definitely keep an eye on: Tech.Pro, combining a very lean, responsive, intuitive and modern web UI with high-quality articles and social networking. The platform feels fully integrated, something that one wants to participate in.

Not only their website, but also their newsletter is nicely done, with cute images accompanying every post.

Tech.Pro is certainly something to keep an eye on in the near future!

nerd-table-cool-table

Awesome Tweets About Recent Blog Post

When writing blog posts, most people are striving to create great content. Creating great content is very hard. Most often, content is niche content, irrelevant content, overlooked content, boring content, advertising content.

But every now and then, great content is created. Often by accident or by luck. How to recognise great content? By checking twitter. Thanks, jOOQ community for being there and sharing your humour and insights with the public. You’re making jOOQ what it is. Here’s some jOOQ community humour:

awesome-blog-reactions

Plagiarism is Copyright Infringement AND Poor Form

Please repost / reblog / spread the word, should you have been victim of a similar act of plagiarism or copyright infringement!

With my blog getting increasingly popular, I’m more and more facing the problem of plagiarism. Plagiarism is bad for a variety of reasons:

  • It hurts the original author’s SEO, as content starts getting less relevant when duplicated verbatim across the net.
  • It is very poor form and just a plain embarassment to the offender.
  • It will inevitably get back at you. Right, Mr Guttenberg?

Why do people engage in plagiarism? When there is Fair Use? Why do people pretend they have authored something themselves, which they have stolen? Why do people obscure their sources?

I am going to take plagiarism very seriously and not tolerate it. With Google and Google Analytics, it is very easy to detect plagiarism. I’ve recently had an article removed from a popular Indian website, which seems to heavily engage in plagiarism: TechGig.com

ITeye.com is another platform from China, whose members ruthlessly engage in plagiarism as well. Yes, Google also ships with Google Translate. Another great tool to detect plagiarism. Beware, offenders! I will be going after you. And if you make money with my content, I am more than happy to collect some of that, or have your domain challenged with your registrar! All top-level domains are eventually protected by the DMCA, as the ICANN is an American-dominated organisation. You don’t want to risk such action just because a couple of geeks on your platform cannot control themselves! And if your platform itself is the offender, then be sure that you will close down very soon!

Here’s a letter I wrote to CSDN.net (registrar) and ITeye.com. I am licensing this letter as public domain, for you to reuse against your own offenders. Take any parts you may need.

To whom it may concern,

I have found your contact through a whois lookup, as ITeye themselves fail to respond to my recent enquiry. I am continuing to notice that a couple of ITeye bloggers and curators copy and translate articles off my blog http://blog.jooq.org, which is a promotional blog for my database product jOOQ.

In particular, these posts here:

… were in fact copied from my popular blog post here:

… which was syndicated with my express permission to DZone and JCG:

Plagiarism and copyright infringement is a non-trivial offence in many countries, including Switzerland from where I am operating. I urge ITeye to

  • give full author attribution to myself for all blog posts that ITeye writers copy and / or translate verbatim
  • have such authors link to my *original* blog post (not to syndications thereof)
  • have such authors keep promotional links in place
  • or to remove such blog posts immediately

I am taking this infringement very seriously, as the above displays go beyond what is known as “Fair Use”. I am sure ITeye understand that it is of utmost priority for a platform such as ITeye to comply with such laws. I am also sure that CSDN, the registrant will be able to execute the appropriate actions, should ITeye fail to comply, in case of which I will need to act on behalf of the American DMCA.

Please do not engage in plagiarism. Please, critically review your writers’ works and actively block all suspicious content.

Sincerely,

Lukas Eder